For High-Growth Tech Lovers, the Trend Indicates That it is Time to Consider Value-Oriented ETFs

Also, subtracting 2% due to “positive sentiment” induced by the Santa Claus rally, it can be inferred that the index actually fell by more than 8%. At the same time, a look at the S&P 500 (in orange) which holds more than 28% of technology assets exhibits a more neutral position, while the Dow Jones Industrial average (in blue), up by 1.52% indicates that the more cyclical names are being prioritized by investors, as potential beneficiaries of the economic recovery.

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Source: Trading View

Going further in the past, the weakness in tech started from the second quarter of 2021 when it became evident that the Fed was adopting a more hawkish tone and bond yields were on the rise. However, the adverse market conditions for technology were masked by the gains from these six most popular stocks, namely, Tesla (TSLA), Apple (AAPL), Microsoft (MSFT), NVIDIA (NVDA), Meta Labs (FB), and Google (GOOGL). Now, with the Nasdaq bearing a P/E ratio of 28, tech valuations remain high compared to the broader market, and the weakness in richly-valued high-growth names in the technology sector should continue, perhaps in the same way as during the Internet bubble of 1999-2000.

Growth to value rotation

Now, moving away from high-growth tech names to lower-valued cyclical names reminds us that the “rotation from growth to value”, which some analysts were invoking in 2021, has gained momentum. For investors, rapidly growing tech stocks with their high R&D and sales expenses primarily focus on growth while value names are more conservative in spending and lay more emphasis on profitability.

To further verify whether the growth to value shift is really happening, I make a comparison between growth and value ETFs as per the chart below. In this case, the iShares Edge MSCI USA Value Factor ETF (VLUE) and the Vanguard Value ETF (VTV) are both up by 5.6% and 3.9% respectively, while the Schwab U.S. Large-Cap Growth ETF (SCHG) and the Technology Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLK) are down by more than 3% each. This one-month performance confirms that value is up, while growth/technology is down.

https://static.seekingalpha.com/uploads/2022/1/9/49663886-16417501193779671.png

Source: Trading View

Looking ahead, in view of the uncertainty associated with Covid variants, supply chain issues, and inflationary concerns in the first half of 2022, there is no guarantee that the current trend favoring value will continue, but, at the same time, we cannot remain insensible to the new market regime. Moreover, for those who have been used to investing in growth made relatively easy due to the momentum induced by the mighty Nasdaq, it may prove difficult to screen the market for high-quality value stocks with appropriate free-cash-flow, balance-sheet, and valuations metrics.

The value-oriented ETF rationale

Hence, it is precisely for these tech investors that investing in value-oriented ETFs where the fund managers select the best stocks, makes sense.

In this respect, VTV with an expense ratio of 0.04% and paying dividends at a yield of 2.15% holds mostly Financials (22%), Healthcare (18.5%), and Industrials (14%) stocks as part of total assets. Finally, for tech lovers, better performing VLUE, with 30.85% of IT exposure, and paying a 2.41% dividend yield at an expense ratio of 0.15% is a better choice.

Disclosure: I am long XLK.