Another Quiet Day on the Economic Calendar Leaves the FED and Risk Sentiment in the Driving Seat

Earlier in the Day:

It was a relatively quiet start to the day on the economic calendar this morning, with the China markets closed today. The Kiwi Dollar was in action in the early hours, however.

Later this morning, the RBA meeting minutes will also draw interest as the markets look to assess the impact of the latest lockdown measures on policy.

For the Kiwi Dollar

Consumer sentiment figures were in focus.

In the 3rd quarter, the Westpac Consumer Sentiment Index fell from 107.1 to 102.7.

According to the Westpac survey,

  • Confidence took a hit, with the index falling by 4.4 points as a result of the latest nationwide lockdown.
  • The decline was more modest, however, than the fall seen back in 2020.
  • While households remain secure about their personal financial situation, global supply chain disruption weighed on spending appetites.

The sub-components:

  • The Present Conditions Index fell by 2.7 points to 95.6, with the Expected Conditions Index down 5.5 points to 107.4.
  • 1-year economic outlook tumbled by 10.0 points to -5.6, with the “Good time to buy” sub-index falling by 7.2 points to -5.2.
  • 5-year economic outlook fell by 6.2 points to 11.5, while the current financial situation sub-index rose by 1.8 points to -3.6.
  • Expected financial situation saw a modest 0.6 point decline to 16.1.

The Kiwi Dollar moved from $0.70293 to $0.70260 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Kiwi Dollar was down by 0.26% to $0.7009.

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was up by 0.05% to ¥109.390 against the U.S Dollar, with the Aussie Dollar up by 0.06% to $0.7256.

The Day Ahead

For the EUR

It’s a particularly quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out of the Eurozone to provide the EUR with direction.

The lack of stats will leave the EUR in the hands of market risk appetite and sentiment towards FED monetary policy.

At the time of writing, the EUR was flat at $1.1726.

For the Pound

It’s a relatively quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. CBI Industrial Trend Orders for September are due out later today. With little else for the markets to consider, we can expect influence. The impact will be limited, however, with the Pound on the defensive ahead of Thursday’s policy decision.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.01% to $1.3658.

Across the Pond

It’s also a relatively quiet day ahead. Housing sector numbers for August are due out later in the day. With the markets focused on the FED, however, the stats are unlikely to have an impact on the day.

On Monday, the U.S Dollar Spot Index rose by 0.09% to end the day at $93.276.

For the Loonie

It’s a quiet day ahead for the Loonie. House price figures for August are due out later in the day.

We don’t expect the numbers to provide the Loonie with direction, however. Market risk sentiment will and crude oil prices will remain the key drivers on the day.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was up by 0.05% to C$1.2815 against the U.S Dollar.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Analysis: Why the Fed Might Welcome a Bond Market Tantrum

Persistently low yields are a feature of bond markets across the developed world, with central banks mostly in no hurry to raise interest rates and a global savings glut that keeps debt securities in constant demand.

But it is in the United States that the contradiction between economic recovery and bond yields is starkest.

Even with growth tipped to surpass 6% this year and a “taper” in sight for the Fed’s bond-buying programme at the end of this year, 10-year yields are still stuck at just above 1.3%..

The Fed probably rejoiced at low yields in the initial stages of the economic recovery, but now needs bonds to respond to the end of pandemic-linked recession, said Padhraic Garvey, head of research for the Americas at ING Bank.

Current pricing, analysts say, looks more consistent with heightened economic uncertainty, whereas higher yields would align markets more with the signals coming from central banks.

“To facilitate that, we argue that there needs to be a tantrum. If the Fed has a taper announcement … and there is no tantrum at all, that in fact is a problem for the Fed,” ING’s Garvey said.

Analysts say a bond market tantrum would involve yields rising 75-100 basis points (bps) within a couple of months.

The original “taper tantrum” in 2013 boosted U.S. yields just over 100 bps in the four months after then Fed boss Ben Bernanke hinted at an unwinding of stimulus measures.

But that kind of sudden jump in yields looks unlikely right now, given how clearly the Fed has telegraphed its plans to taper its bond-buying. And as 2013 showed, bond market tantrums carry nasty side-effects including equity sell-offs and higher borrowing costs worldwide.

A happy medium, analysts say, might be for benchmark yields to rise 30-40 bps to 1.6-1.8%

FED AND BANKS NEED AMMUNITION

Besides wanting higher yields to better reflect the pace of economic growth, the Fed also needs to recoup some ammunition to counter future economic reversals.

The Fed funds rate – the overnight rate which guides U.S. borrowing costs – is at zero to 0.25%, and U.S. policymakers, unlike the Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank, are disinclined to take interest rates negative.

The Fed won’t want to find itself in the position of the ECB and BOJ, whose stimulus options at the moment are limited to cutting rates further into negative territory or buying more bonds to underwrite government spending.

Jim Leaviss, chief investment officer at M&G Investments for public fixed income, said policymakers would probably like the Fed fund rate to be at 2%, “so, when we end up in the next downturn, the Fed will have some space to cut interest rates without hitting the lower bound of zero quickly”.

Another reason higher yields might be welcomed is because banks would like steeper yield curves to boost the attractiveness of making longer-term loans funded with short-term borrowing from depositors or markets.

Thomas Costerg, senior economist at Pictet Wealth Management, notes that the gap between the Fed funds rate and 10-year yields of about 125 bps now is well below the average 200 bps seen during previous peaks in economic expansion.

He believes the Fed would favour a 200 bps yield slope, “not only because it would validate their view that the economic cycle is fine but also because a slope of 200 bps is healthy for the banking sector’s maturity transformation.”

GRAVITATIONAL FORCE

But even a tantrum might not bring a lasting rise in yields.

First, while the Fed may look with envy at Norway and New Zealand where yields have risen in expectation of rate rises, it has stressed that its own official rates won’t rise for a while.

Structural factors are at play too, not least global demand for the only large AAA-rated bond market with positive yields.

The Fed also, in theory at least, guides rates towards the natural rate of interest, the level where full employment coincides with stable inflation.

But this rate has shrunk steadily. Adjusted for projected inflation, the “longer-run” funds rate – the Fed’s proxy for the natural rate – has fallen to 0.5% from 2.4% in 2007. If correct, it leaves the Fed with little leeway.

Demographics and slower trend growth are cited as reasons for the decline in the natural rate though a paper https://bit.ly/3nVMxMv presented last month at the Jackson Hole symposium also blamed a rise in income inequality since the 1980s.

The paper said the rich, who are more likely to save, were taking a bigger slice of overall income and the resulting savings glut was weighing on the natural rate of interest.

“One lesson from this year is that there is massive gravitational force, a price-insensitive demand which is pressing down on Treasury yields,” Pictet’s Costerg said.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

(Reporting by Stefano Rebaudo; Additional reporting by Dhara Ranasinghe in London and Dan Burns in New York; Editing by Sujata Rao and David Clarke)

 

China Evergrande Contagion Concerns Rile Global Markets

Shares in Evergrande, which has been scrambling to raise funds to pay its many lenders, suppliers and investors, closed down 10.2% at HK$2.28 on Monday, after earlier plummeting 19% to its weakest level since May 2010.

Regulators have warned that its $305 billion of liabilities could spark broader risks to China’s financial system if its debts are not stabilised.

World shares skidded and the dollar firmed as investors fretted about the spillover risk to the global economy. U.S. stocks were sharply lower, with the S&P 500 down nearly 2%.

A major test comes this week, with Evergrande due to pay $83.5 million in interest relating to its March 2022 bond on Thursday. It has another $47.5 million payment due on Sept. 29 for March 2024 notes.

Both bonds would default if Evergrande fails to settle the interest within 30 days of the scheduled payment dates.

In any default scenario, Evergrande, teetering between a messy meltdown, a managed collapse or the less likely prospect of a bailout by Beijing, will need to restructure the bonds, but analysts expect a low recovery ratio for investors.

Evergrande’s troubles also pressured the broader property sector, with Hong Kong-listed shares of small-sized Chinese developer Sinic Holdings down 87%, wiping $1.5 billion off its market value before trading was suspended.

Evergrande executives are working to salvage its business prospects, including by starting to repay investors in its wealth management products with real estate.

“(Evergrande’s) stock will continue to fall, because there’s not yet a solution that appears to be helping the company to ease its liquidity stress, and there are still so many uncertainties about what the company will do in case of a restructuring,” Kington Lin, managing director of Asset Management Department at Canfield Securities Limited, said.

Lin said Evergrande’s shares could fall to below HK$1 if it is forced to sell most of its assets in a restructuring.

“As of right now, I don’t see any systemic risk for the global economy from the Evergrande situation, but there doesn’t need to be any systemic risk in order for markets to be affected,” David Bahnsen, chief investment officer, The Bahnsen Group, a wealth management firm based in Newport Beach, Calif, said in emailed commentary.

There was some confidence, however, that the situation would be contained.

“Beijing has demonstrated in recent years that it is fully able and willing to step in to stem widespread contagion when major financial/corporate institutions fail,” Alvin Tan, FX Strategist at RBC Capital Markets, said in a research note.

DOLLAR BONDS

Despite mounting worries about the future of what was once the country’s top-selling property developer, analysts, however, have played down comparisons to the 2008 collapse of U.S. investment bank Lehman Brothers.

“First, the dollar bonds will likely get restructured, but most of the debt is in global mutual funds, ETFs, and some Chinese companies and not banks or other important financial institutions,” said LPL Financials’ Ryan Detrick.

“Lehman Brothers was held on nearly all other financial institution’s books,” he said. “Secondly, we think the odds do favor the Chinese communist government will get involved should there be a default.”

Policymakers in China have been telling Evergrande’s major lenders to extend interest payments or rollover loans, but market watchers are largely of the view that a direct bailout from the government is unlikely.

The People’s Bank of China, its central bank, and the nation’s banking watchdog summoned Evergrande’s executives in August in a rare move and warned that it needed to reduce its debt risks and prioritise stability.

Trading of the company’s bonds underscore just how dramatically investor expectations of its prospects have deteriorated this year.

The 8.25% March 2022 dollar bond was traded at 29.156 cents on Monday, yielding over 500%, compared to 13.7% at the start of year. The 9.5% March 2024 bond was at 26.4 cents, yielding over 80%, compared to 14.6% at the start of 2021.

PROPERTY PUNISHED

Goldman Sachs said last week that because Evergrande has dollar bonds issued by both the parent and a special purpose vehicle, recoveries in a potential restructuring could differ between the two sets of bonds, and the process may be prolonged.

Investors, meanwhile, are increasingly worried about the contagion risk, mainly in the debt-laden Chinese property sector, which along with the yuan came under pressure on Monday.

The yuan fell to a three-week low of 6.4831 per dollar in offshore trade.

Hong Kong-listed Sinic, which saw massive selling pressure, has nearly $700 million in offshore debts maturing before June 2022, including $246 million due in a month — a bond which has tumbled to around 89 cents on the dollar.

Sinic has a junk rating from Fitch, which downgraded its outlook to negative on Friday.

Other property stocks such as Sunac, China’s No.4 property developer, tumbled 10.5%, while state-backed Greentown China shed around 6.7%.

Guangzhou R&F Properties Co said on Monday it was raising as much as $2.5 billion by borrowing from major shareholders and selling a subsidiary, highlighting the scramble for cash as distress signals spread in the sector.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

($1 = 7.7863 Hong Kong dollars)

(Reporting by Clare Jim; additional reporting by Tom Westbrook and Alun John; Writing by Sumeet Chatterjee; Editing by Shri Navaratnam; Mark Potter and Alexander Smith)

USD/CAD: Loonie Hits Over One-Month Low on Subdued Oil Prices, Election Uncertainties

The Canadian dollar hit over a one-month low against its U.S. counterpart, sliding for the third straight day on Monday as falling energy prices and snap election uncertainties weighed on the commodity currency.

The USD/CAD pair rose to 1.2895 today, up from Friday’s close of 1.2766. The Canadian dollar lost over 1.2% last month and further depreciated over 1.5% so far this month.

Today’s federal reserve decision and the election in Canada will be closely watched by investors. There is no sign of a majority in the Canadian election on Monday, a second time in a row, leaving either Justin Trudeau or Erin O’Toole trying to govern with a minority.

Investors are concerned that elections will lead to a deadlock that hinders government action against COVID-19 and impedes the recovery of the economy.

“What we think will matter the most from a market perspective is whether there will eventually be a workable majority. Up until some majority emerges, the Canadian dollar may continue to discount political uncertainty,” noted Francesco Pesole, FX Strategist at ING.

“At the same time, barring the worst-case scenario of a hung parliament and new elections, we still expect a gradual dissipation of political risk in the coming weeks to help CAD close its mis-valuation gap (USD/CAD is 2% overvalued, according to our short-term fair value model) as the loonie may start to benefit more freely from its good fundamentals – and above all, the prospect of more BoC policy normalisation. We still expect USD/CAD to trade below 1.25 in 4Q21.”

Canada is the world’s fourth-largest exporter of oil, which edge lower as production in the Gulf of Mexico slowly returns. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were trading 1.38% lower at $70.99 a barrel. Lower oil prices lead to lower U.S. dollar earnings for Canadian exporters, resulting in a decreased value of the loonie.

“We don’t think the federal election is weighing on the CAD in any significant way.  In fact, while the CAD has fallen against the USD this week, it has lost less ground than most of its G10 currency peers.  Short-term CAD vols have firmed but remain within this year’s range (1w vol peaked at 9% in February),” noted Shaun Osborne, Chief FX Strategist at Scotiabank.

“The election race remains tight, and another minority government remains the most likely outcome.  Research by our Scotia Economics colleagues suggests that there is ultimately very little difference in the fiscal outcomes through 2025 between either the Liberal or Conservative parties’ platforms.  Either way, a minority will limit the next government’s room for significant manoeuvre.”

The dollar index, which measures the value of the dollar against six foreign currencies, was trading 0.01% higher at 93.204. The dollar reaches a one-month high, boosted by recent strong economic data and speculation regarding Fed tapering. Fed policymakers will meet this week and open discussions about reducing their monthly bond purchases are expected.

It is highly likely that the world’s dominant reserve currency, the USD, will rise by end of the year, largely due to the expectation of two rate hikes by the Fed in 2023. With the dollar strengthening and a possibility that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates earlier than expected, the USD/CAD pair may experience a rise.

Marketmind: Watch Those Spiralling Gas Prices

In the meantime, other sagas are focusing investors’ minds. Chinese property developer Evergrande’s inexorable journey towards default is pummelling Hong Kong stocks (mainland markets are shut) and has taken yields on Chinese junk bonds to 14%, the highest in almost a decade.

So it’s a firmly risk-off on Monday with European and U.S. equity futures down 1%, following Friday’s dismal session when the S&P 500 plunged nearly to one-month lows and the VIX volatility gauge surged to a one-month high.

Much of that is, of course, down to concerns for economic growth and inflation, the debt ceiling wrangling in Congress and persistently high COVID caseloads.

Which takes us to the other issue of the day — spiralling gas prices and the potential impact on inflation.

Already, these have forced some power producers out of business and shut fertiliser plants in Britain. Knock-on effects look inevitable, on sectors ranging from slaughter houses to supermarkets, alongside higher winter heating bills.

Pressure is growing on authorities — Britain is planning measures to shield businesses and consumers and U.S. manufacturers are urging curbs on liquid gas (LNG) exports. Politics enters the picture too — EU lawmakers have demanded authorities probe Russia’s Gazprom for market manipulation.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

(Reporting by Sujata Rao)

Erdogan’s Waning Patience: Four Questions for Turkey’s Central Bank

The bank has kept its benchmark rate at 19% since March, when Erdogan installed Sahap Kavcioglu as its latest governor. That makes it one of the highest policy rates in the world – although so too is Turkey’s inflation rate, which touched 19.25% last month.

Ahead of a monetary policy meeting set for 2 p.m. (11:00 GMT) on Thursday in Ankara, here are four key questions:

IS A RATE CUT COMING?

After months of hawkish talk that allowed the lira to recover from an all-time low in June, the central bank has changed its tune in the last few weeks.

On Sept. 1 conference calls with investors, Kavcioglu did not repeat a longstanding pledge to keep the policy rate above inflation. Two days later, data showed inflation did indeed surpass 19% https://tmsnrt.rs/3yTLHBq, leaving real rates negative.

Kavcioglu also began downplaying this “headline” inflation figure and instead stressed that a “core” measure – which is lower – is more appropriate given the fallout from the pandemic.

In a speech on Sept. 8, he said a near 30% spike in food inflation represents “short-term volatilities”, so the bank will focus more on the core measure that dipped to 16.76%. He added that policy was tight enough and predicted a falling price trend in the fourth quarter.

Investors have taken all this as a dovish turn that suggests that rate cuts are on the way. Some have warned of a “policy mistake” if they come too soon.

Fourteen of 17 economists polled by Reuters expect easing to begin in the fourth quarter, with two, including the Institute of International Finance, predicting it will start this week.

“Though most expect no rate cut, the bank’s new guidance suggests it would not be surprising to see one on Sept. 23 if it takes a slight deceleration in core inflation as permanent,” said Ozlem Derici Sengul, founding partner at Spinn Consulting, in Istanbul.

HOW LONG WILL ERDOGAN WAIT?

Many analysts say Erdogan appears to be growing impatient for monetary stimulus, given loans are expensive and he faces a tough election no later than 2023. A few say a prompt rate cut could even signal plans for an early vote.

In recent months, the central bank has urged patience due to unexpected inflation pressure brought on by rising global commodities prices and a surge in summer demand as pandemic restrictions eased.

Despite the risk of currency depreciation https://tmsnrt.rs/3neUCLN and stubbornly high inflation, Erdogan will likely get what he wants soon.

A self-described “enemy of interest rates”, he ousted the last three central bank chiefs over a 20-month span due to policy disagreements.

In June, Erdogan said he spoke to Kavcioglu about the need for a rate cut after August.

In early August, he said “we will start to see a fall in rates” given it was “not possible” for inflation to rise any more.

Market tensions “are set to increase as President Erdogan continues to pile on political pressure for rate cuts, while inflation pressures are building,” said Phoenix Kalen, global head of emerging markets research at Societe Generale.

WHEN WILL INFLATION COOL DOWN?

Annual headline inflation should remain high through October and begin to dip in November due to the base effect of a jump late last year, since which it has continued to rise.

The government forecasts inflation will drop to 16.2% by the end of the year, while Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank see 16.7%. That should provide a window for at least one rate cut in the fourth quarter, most analysts say.

Yet because Turkey imports heavily, further lira weakness could push inflation higher and complicate or even thwart any easing. High import costs were reflected in the 45.5% annual jump in the producer price index last month.

Another risk is that the U.S. Federal Reserve removes its pandemic-era stimulus sooner than expected, which would raise U.S. yields and hurt currencies of emerging markets with high foreign debt, like Turkey.

Analysts say the biggest problem is the central bank’s diminished credibility in the face of political interference, leading to years of double-digit price rises and little confidence that inflation will soon return to a 5% target.

Ricardo Reis, a London School of Economics professor who presented a paper this month at the Brookings Institute, found that Turkey’s “inflation anchor seems definitely lost” based on market expectations data from 2018 to 2021.

HOW ARE INVESTORS AND SAVERS PREPARING?

When Kavcioglu downplayed inflation pressure earlier this month, the lira weakened 1.5% in its biggest daily drop since May. It has depreciated nearly 15% since Erdogan replaced Kavcioglu’s hawkish predecessor Naci Agbal in March.

Foreign investors hold only about 5% of Turkish debt after reducing their holdings for years.

Still, some say that rebounds in exports, tourism revenues and in the central bank’s foreign reserves make lira assets more attractive.

“With inventories so low in Europe, I can’t see how exports are not going to continue to do well,” said Aberdeen Standard Investments portfolio manager Kieran Curtis.

“It does feel to me like there is more of a move towards loosening from the authorities (but) I don’t think anyone is expecting a cut at the next meeting,” he said.

In Turkey, soaring prices for basic goods such as food and furnishings have prompted individuals and companies to snap up record levels of dollars and gold. They held $238 billion in hard currencies this month.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

(Additional reporting by Ali Kucukgocmen in Istanbul and Marc Jones in London; Editing by Hugh Lawson)

A Quiet Economic Calendar Leaves the Dollar in the Spotlight

Earlier in the Day:

It was a quiet start to the day on the economic calendar this morning. With the China and Japan markets closed today, there were no material stats for the markets to consider in the early hours.

The lack of stats left the markets to respond to moves through the U.S session on Friday, which had left riskier assets in the red.

For the Majors

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was down by 0.05% to ¥109.990 against the U.S Dollar, with the Aussie Dollar down by 0.25% to $0.7261. The Kiwi Dollar was down by 0.17% to $0.7028.

The Day Ahead

For the EUR

It’s a relatively quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. Wholesale inflation figures for Germany are due out later today.

Barring a marked spike, however, we don’t expect the August figures to have a material impact on the EUR.

At the time of writing, the EUR was down by 0.01% to $1.1724.

For the Pound

It’s a particularly quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out of the UK to provide the Pound with direction.

The lack of stats will leave the Pound in the hands of market risk sentiment as the markets look ahead to Thursday’s MPC decision.

At the time of writing, the Pound was down by 0.12% to $1.3725.

Across the Pond

It’s also particularly quiet day ahead. There are no material stats due out to provide the Dollar and the broader markets with direction.

The lack of stats will leave the markets to continue to focus on the FOMC and what to expect on Wednesday.

The U.S Dollar Spot Index ended Friday up 0.28% to $93.195.

For the Loonie

It’s a particularly quiet day ahead for the Loonie, however. There are no major stats due out of Canada to provide the Loonie with direction.

The lack of stats will leave the Loonie in the hands of crude oil prices and market risk sentiment.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was down by 0.06% to C$1.2774 against the U.S Dollar.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Dollar Touches Three-Week High, Lifted by Recent Data, Fed Taper View

The dollar index, a gauge of the greenback’s value against six major currencies, rose to 93.220, the highest since the third week of August. It was last up 0.4% at 93.207.

For the week, the dollar index gained 0.6%, its largest weekly percentage rise since mid-August.

The Fed holds a two-day monetary policy meeting next week and is expected to open discussions on reducing its monthly bond purchases, while tying any actual change to U.S. job growth in September and beyond.

“While we doubt that the FOMC will set out a plan for tapering its asset purchases, the new economic projections may shed some light on its reaction function given building cyclical inflationary pressures,” wrote Jonathan Petersen, markets economist at Capital Economics, in its latest research note.

“Our view remains that inflation in the U.S. will stay elevated for longer than the FOMC and investors currently anticipate, in turn supporting higher U.S. yields and a stronger dollar,” he added.

Speculation about a Fed taper this year gathered pace after U.S. retail sales unexpectedly increased in August, data showed on Thursday, rising 0.7% from the previous month despite expectations of a 0.8% fall. A business sentiment survey also showed a big improvement.

In afternoon New York trading, the euro slid 0.3% to $1.1729, after hitting a three-week low of $1.1724 earlier in the session.

The University of Michigan consumer sentiment for September inched higher to 71 versus the final August reading of 70.3, but overall analysts said the rise was nowhere near the improvements seen in the Empire States and Philadelphia Fed manufacturing surveys.

The dollar held gains after the Michigan sentiment report.

Currency markets were generally quiet on Friday with traders reluctant to take on new positions ahead of a clutch of important central bank meetings next week including the Fed, the Bank of Japan and the Bank of England.

The dollar was up 0.5% against the Swiss franc at 0.9320 francs, after earlier hitting a five-month high of 0.9324 francs .

The dollar rose 0.2% to 109.92 yen.

The yen has shown limited reaction to the ruling Liberal Democratic Party’s leadership race, which formally kicks off on Friday ahead of a Sept. 29 vote. The LDP’s parliamentary dominance means the party’s new leader will become prime minister.

The dollar also rose to a two-week high against the offshore yuan and was last up 0.3% at 6.4711. The yuan is being pressured by growing worries about China’s real estate sector as investors fear property giant China Evergrande could default on its coupon payment next week.

The British pound fell 0.4% to $1.3738 as UK retail sales undershot expectations. However, with investors bringing forward forecasts for a Bank of England interest rate hike to mid-2022, sterling remains supported.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

(Reporting by Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman, Alex Richardson and Sonya Hepinstall)

USD/CAD: Loonie Hits Nearly One-Month Low Ahead of Snap Election

The Canadian dollar hit a near one-month low against its U.S. counterpart on Friday as falling energy prices and September 20 election uncertainties weighed on the commodity currency.

Next week’s federal reserve decision and the election in Canada will be closely watched by investors. Investors are concerned that Monday’s elections will lead to a deadlock that hinders government action against COVID-19 and impedes the recovery of the economy.

The USD/CAD pair rose to 1.2762 today, up from Thursday’s close of 1.2681. The Canadian dollar lost over 1.2% last month and has depreciated about 1% so far this month.

“Barring the scenario of a hung parliament, political uncertainty in Canada should ultimately dissipate, helping CAD realign with its short-term fair value. The latest data (labour market and inflation) have all but confirmed the view that the Bank of Canada will have to step in with another round of tapering in October, which should leave it on track to fully unwind QE by year-end, or by early-2022,” noted Francesco Pesole, FX Strategist at ING.

“Ultimately, markets will be left with some room to speculate that the first hike will be delivered before mid-2022 (which is currently in the BoC rate-path projections). The set of good fundamentals should, in our view, provide some sustained support to CAD into year-end, and we expect USD/CAD to trade consistently below 1.25 in 4Q21.”

Canada is the world’s fourth-largest exporter of oil, which edge lower as production in the Gulf of Mexico slowly returns. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were trading 1.29% lower at $71.66 a barrel. Lower oil prices lead to lower U.S. dollar earnings for Canadian exporters, resulting in a decreased value of the loonie.

On Thursday, Canada’s Statistics Canada reported that wholesale sales declined 2.1% to $70.1 billion in July, as building materials and supplies sales plummeted. In total, it was the second consecutive decline and the biggest since April 2020. That raises concerns among investors that the economy is slowing.

The dollar index, which measures the value of the dollar against six foreign currencies, was trading 0.25% higher at 93.164. The dollar reaches a three-week high, boosted by recent strong economic data and speculation regarding Fed tapering. Fed policymakers will meet next week and open discussions about reducing their monthly bond purchases are expected.

It is highly likely that the world’s dominant reserve currency, the USD, will rise by end of the year, largely due to the expectation of two rate hikes by the Fed in 2023. With the dollar strengthening and a possibility that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates earlier than expected, the USD/CAD pair may experience a rise.

Philippine Cbank Tempers Outlook, Cuts 2021 c/a Surplus Forecast

It now projects next year’s current account to switch to a deficit of $1.4 billion, or 0.3% of GDP, instead of the previous forecast of a $6.7 billion surplus equivalent to 1.5% of GDP, figures presented at a media briefing showed.

The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) said the latest projections took into account “downside risks” that continue to build up, underpinned by the emergence of highly transmissible COVID-19 variants.

“The lingering uncertainty continues to cast a shadow on external sector prospects over the near term as the direction and duration of the pandemic remains little known,” it said in a statement.

The balance of payments this year is now projected to yield a surplus of $4.1 billion, or 1.1% of GDP, down from the previous forecast of a $7.1 billion surplus, or 1.8% of GDP.

For 2022, the BOP surplus is seen narrowing to $1.7 billion, or 0.4% of GDP, lower than the previous forecast of $2.7 billion, or 0.6% of GDP.

The BSP also lowered its projections for end-2021 and end-2022 gross international reserves to $114 billion and $115 billion, from $115 billion and $117 billion, respectively.

The revisions reflect the BSP’s “more guarded” outlook for the global economy and developments at home, including the downscaling of this year’s GDP growth target, said Zeno Ronald Abenoja, managing director at the central bank’ Department of Economic Research.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

(Reporting by Enrico Dela Cruz; Editing by Martin Petty)

UK Retail Sales Puts the Pound in the Spotlight

Earlier in the Day:

It was a quiet start to the day on the economic calendar this morning. The Kiwi Dollar was back in action this morning.

For the Kiwi Dollar

Business PMI figures were in focus in the early hours.

In August, the Business PMI tumbled from 62.6 to 40.1. The PMI had risen from 60.7 to 62.6 in July.

According to the August survey,

  • Down by 22.1 points from July, the PMI avoided a fall to sub-30 levels seen amidst the level 4 lockdown of 2020.
  • The production sub-index took the biggest hit, slumping from 63.9 to 27.7.
  • New orders fell from 63.7 to 44.4, with deliveries and finished stocks also falling below the 50 mark.
  • By contrast, the employment sub-index saw a more modest fall from 57.9 to 54.5.

The Kiwi Dollar moved from $0.70726 to $0.70715 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Kiwi Dollar was down by 0.01% to $0.7074.

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was flat at ¥109.730 against the U.S Dollar, while the Aussie Dollar was up by 0.04% to $0.7295.

The Day Ahead

For the EUR

It’s a relatively quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. Finalized August inflation figures for the Eurozone are due out later today.

With little else for the markets to consider, expect any upward revisions to influence the EUR.

At the time of writing, the EUR was down by 0.02% to $1.1765.

For the Pound

It’s a busy day ahead on the economic calendar. Retail sales figures for August are due out later this morning.

With the markets looking ahead to next week’s BoE monetary policy decision, we can expect Pound sensitivity to the numbers.

Following a pickup in inflationary pressure and better than expected employment figures, positive numbers would suggest a more hawkish MPC.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.02% to $1.3798.

Across the Pond

It’s a relatively quiet day ahead. Michigan consumer sentiment and expectation figures are due out later today.

With market sensitivity to consumer sentiment heighted as a result of the Delta variant, expect the numbers to influence market risk sentiment.

The U.S Dollar Spot Index ended Thursday up 0.41% to $92.932.

For the Loonie

It’s a particularly quiet day ahead for the Loonie, however. There are no major stats due out of Canada to provide the Loonie with direction.

The lack of stats will leave the Loonie in the hands of crude oil prices and market risk sentiment.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was up by 0.02% to C$1.2681 against the U.S Dollar.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Dollar Index Climbs After U.S. Retail Sales Show Surprise Rebound

The dollar index, which measures the U.S. currency against six others, added to gains following the report and was last up 0.5% at 92.866. It hit its highest level since Aug. 27.

Retail sales rose 0.7% last month, boosted in part by back-to-school shopping and child tax credit payments, while data for July was revised down.

A separate report showed U.S. initial claims for state unemployment benefits increased 20,000 to a seasonally adjusted 332,000 for the week ended Sept. 11. Economists had forecast 330,000 applications for the latest week.

“If you look at the retail sales number, it’s quite constructive even with the revisions, so we are seeing the dollar benefit from that, particularly against the funding currencies like the euro, Swiss and the yen,” said Bipan Rai, North American head of FX strategy for CIBC Capital Markets in Toronto.

The news could bolster investor expectations for next week’s Federal Reserve policy meeting and how soon the U.S central bank will start to taper stimulus.

“It feels like whatever lingering concerns there were with the underlying economy … that was kind of washed away a little bit. So as we move towards the Fed next week, the evidence backs up the idea that we’re going to get a taper signal from the Fed at the meeting,” he said.

On Tuesday, the dollar index fell to a one-week low of 92.321 after a softer-than-expected inflation report. Its low for the month was 91.941, on Sept. 3, when payrolls data disappointed.

Investors are looking for clarity on the outlook for both tapering and interest rates at the Fed’s two-day policy meeting that ends next Wednesday.

Tapering typically lifts the dollar as it suggests the Fed is one step closer to tighter monetary policy.

It also means the central bank will be buying fewer debt assets, in effect reducing the amount of dollars in circulation, which in turn lifts the currency’s value.

The dollar also gained 0.3% to 109.70 yen , after sliding to a six-week low of 109.110 in the previous session.

The euro was 0.4% lower at $1.1766.

The Swiss franc also fell against the dollar and was last at 0.9263 franc per dollar.

Elsewhere, the Australian dollar was down 0.5% at $0.7296.

Earlier, data showed the country’s jobless rate unexpectedly fell to 4.5%, but the statistics bureau said the change reflected a drop in the participation rate rather than a strengthening of the labor market.

In cryptocurrencies, moves in bitcoin were relatively subdued. It was last down 0.9% at $47,711. Ether changed hands at $3,589, down 0.7%.

AMC Entertainment Holdings Inc boss Adam Aron said in a tweet this week that the theater chain would accept ether, bitcoin cash and litecoin alongside bitcoin for ticket purchases.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

(Reporting by Caroline Valetkevitch; Additional reporting by Ritvik Carvalho in London and Kevin Buckland in Tokyo; Editing by Alexander Smith, Mark Potter and Jonathan Oatis)

 

USD/CAD: Loonie Weakens as Oil Prices Slip, Election in Focus

The Canadian dollar weakened against its U.S. counterpart on Thursday as the firm greenback and falling energy prices weighed on the commodity currency ahead of the September 20 election.

The USD/CAD pair rose to 1.2688 today, up from Wednesday’s close of 1.2633. The Canadian dollar lost over 1.2% last month and has depreciated about 0.6% so far this month.

Canada is the world’s fourth-largest exporter of oil, which edge lower as the U.S. storm threat fades. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were trading 0.92% lower at $71.96 a barrel. Lower oil prices lead to lower U.S. dollar earnings for Canadian exporters, resulting in a decreased value of the loonie.

Moreover, Canada’s Statistics Canada reported that wholesale sales declined 2.1% to $70.1 billion in July, as building materials and supplies sales plummeted. In total, it was the second consecutive decline and the biggest since April 2020. That raises concerns among investors that the economy is slowing.

“In the near term, CAD faces a number of headwinds. Economic data momentum has turned negative. Softening incoming data combined with an impending election (20 September) means that BoC messaging is likely neutral in the near term,” noted analysts at Citi.

“However, for our medium-term view, given Canada’s high vaccination rate, more lockdowns seem very unlikely, and the economic data should come in more strongly as we shift away from 2Q prints. Canada will also likely see more fiscal post-election.”

The dollar index, which measures the value of the dollar against six foreign currencies, was trading 0.37% higher at 92.892. On Thursday, retail sales data showed an unexpected increase in August, easing some concerns about slowing economic growth, which supported the greenback.

It is highly likely that the world’s dominant reserve currency, the USD, will rise by end of the year, largely due to the expectation of two rate hikes by the Fed in 2023. With the dollar strengthening and a possibility that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates earlier than expected, the USD/CAD pair may experience a rise.

ECB’s Rehn Warns Governments to Count on Higher Rates

Thanks to growing vaccination rates and supportive economic policy, the central bank sees Finland’s gross domestic product growing by 3.5% in 2021, up from the 2.9% projected in June, while the 2022 estimate was lowered to 2.8% from 3%.

However the bank added that high debt ratios in euro area countries weaken the sustainability of the bloc’s expansion.

“Even though a rise in interest rates is not yet within sight, it will nevertheless one day take place,” Finnish central bank chief Olli Rehn said. “This should be taken into account in budgetary planning in all the euro area countries.”

The central bank raised its inflation estimate for 2021 to 1.5% from 1.4% and maintained its 2022 forecast at 1.6%.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

(Reporting by Essi Lehto; Editing by Balazs Koranyi)

 

Jobless Claims and Retail Sales Put the Greenback and the U.S Economy in the Spotlight

Earlier in the Day:

It was another busy start to the day on the economic calendar this morning. The Aussie Dollar, Kiwi Dollar, and the Japanese Yen were in action this morning.

For the Kiwi Dollar

GDP numbers were in focus in the early hours.

In the 2nd quarter, the New Zealand economy expanded by 2.8% versus a forecasted 1.3%. The economy had expanded by 1.4% in the previous quarter.

According to NZ Stats,

  • Services industries led the way, with retail trade and accommodation the largest contributor to growth.
  • Air transport and transport support services also delivered support.
  • Household consumption expenditure fell by 1.4%, however, due to a 1.9% decline in household spending on services.

The Kiwi Dollar moved from $0.71253 to $0.71334 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Kiwi Dollar was up by 0.23% to $0.7122.

For the Aussie Dollar

Employment figures were key this morning.

In August, full employment fell by 68k following a 4.2k decline in July. Employment tumbled by 146.3k, however, versus a forecasted 90.0k decline. In July, employment had risen by 2.2k.

According to the ABS,

  • The unemployment rate fell from 4.6% to 4.5%, with the participation rate declining from 66.0% to 65.2%.
  • Year-on-year, the number of unemployed was down by 298,000.

The Aussie Dollar moved from $0.73431 to $0.73365 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Aussie Dollar was up by 0.10% to $0.73367.

For the Japanese Yen

In August, Japan’s trade balance fell from a ¥439.4bn surplus to a ¥635.4bn deficit. Economists had forecast a deficit of ¥47.7bn

According to figures released by the  Ministry of Finance,

  • Exports increased by 26.2%, year-on-year, while imports were up 44.7%.
  • To China, exports rose by 12.6%, with exports to the U.S up 22.8%.
  • Exports to Western Europe increased by 14.1%.
  • Imports from China rose by 23.2%, with imports from the U.S up 33.5%.
  • From Western Europe, imports rose by 48.4%.

The Japanese Yen moved from ¥109.359 to ¥109.424 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was up by 0.04% to ¥109.340 against the U.S Dollar.

The Day Ahead

For the EUR

It’s a quieter day ahead on the economic calendar. Trade data for the Eurozone will be in focus later today. Barring dire numbers, however, the numbers are unlikely to have a material impact on the EUR.

On the monetary policy front, ECB President Lagarde is due to speak later today. Any chatter on policy or the economic outlook would move the dial.

At the time of writing, the EUR was flat at $1.1817.

For the Pound

It’s a particularly quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out of the UK ahead of tomorrow’s retail sales figures.

With the lack of stats, we can expect further market reaction to the employment and inflation figures from earlier in the week.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.02% to $1.3843.

Across the Pond

It’s a busy day ahead. Retail sales, jobless claims, and the Philly FED Manufacturing PMI for September are due out.

Expect the jobless claims and retail sales figures to have a greater impact on the Dollar and market risk sentiment

At the time of writing, the U.S Dollar Spot Index was flat at 92.475.

For the Loonie

It’s a quiet day ahead for the Loonie.

Wholesale sales figures for July are due out later today. Barring particularly dire numbers, however, the numbers should have a muted impact on the majors.

Market risk sentiment will be the key driver on the day.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was down by 0.02% to C$1.2632 against the U.S Dollar.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

USD/CAD: Loonie Gains as Inflation Hits Highest Since 2003, Firm Oil Lends Support

The Canadian dollar strengthened against its U.S. counterpart on Wednesday after the annual inflation rate increased to an 18-year high in August; firmness in oil prices also lent support.

Inflation ticked above the Bank of Canada’s 1%-3% control range for the fifth consecutive month in August, according to Statistics Canada. Last month, the consumer price index grew by 4.1%, the fastest rate since March 2003.

The USD/CAD pair fell to 1.263 today, down from Tuesday’s close of 1.2693. The Canadian dollar lost over 1.2% last month and has depreciated about 0.3% so far this month.

“The Canadian dollar has shown some tentative signs of recovery at the start of this week, but yesterday’s risk-off turn in global markets sent USD/CAD back to the 1.2700 level. We think political uncertainty is currently taking a toll on CAD and partly explaining the divergence with the other oil-sensitive G10 currency, Norway’s krone, which has instead found more solid support of late,” noted Francesco Pesole, FX Strategist at ING.

“We think CAD will struggle to stage a sustained rally before Monday’s Federal election, when the emergence of a potential coalition may ease the negative drag of political noise on the currency.”

Canada is the world’s fourth-largest exporter of oil, which edge higher on low U.S crude inventories fell. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were trading 3.63% higher at $73.02 a barrel. Higher oil prices lead to higher U.S. dollar earnings for Canadian exporters, resulting in an increased value of the loonie.

The dollar index, which measures the value of the dollar against six foreign currencies, was trading 0.13% lower at 92.502. The greenback broadly fell on Tuesday after inflation slowed in August after reaching its highest level in 13 years in July. That raised the question of when the Fed will taper stimulus and hike rates from the current record low.

However, it is highly likely that the world’s dominant reserve currency, the USD, will rise by end of the year, largely due to the expectation of two rate hikes by the Fed in 2023. With the dollar strengthening and a possibility that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates earlier than expected, the USD/CAD pair may experience a rise.

A Busy Economic Calendar Puts the EUR, the Loonie, the Pound, and the Greenback in Focus

Earlier in the Day:

It was a busy start to the day on the economic calendar this morning. The Aussie Dollar was back in action in the early hours, with economic data from China also in focus.

For the Aussie Dollar

In September, the Westpac Consumer Sentiment Index rose by 2.0% to 106.2. The Index had fallen by 4.4% to 104.1 in August.

According to the latest Westpac Report,

  • In spite of lockdown measures in Australia’s two major cities, consumer sentiment remained resilient in September.
  • Improving vaccination rates supported consumer confidence in the month.

Looking at the sub-components:

  • Economic conditions next 12-months jumped by 4.6%, with conditions next 5-years up 4.8%.
  • Family finances vs a year ago rose by 1.7%, with finances next 12-months up 2.1%.
  • Time to buy a dwelling jumped by 8.8%, with the Unemployment Expectations Index falling by 3.3%.
  • While the House Price Expectations Index rose by 1.4%, time to buy a major household item fell by 2.7%.

The Aussie Dollar moved from $0.73191 to $0.73134 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Aussie Dollar was down by 0.16% to $0.7305.

From China

Industrial production was up by 5.3%, year-on-year, in August versus a forecasted 5.8% increase. In July, production had been up by 6.4%.

Fixed asset investment was up 8.9% versus a forecasted 9.0%. In July, fixed asset investments had been up 10.3%.

The Aussie Dollar moved from $0.73083 to $0.73014 upon release of the figures.

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was up by 0.11% to ¥109.570 against the U.S Dollar, with the Kiwi Dollar down by 0.34% to $0.7074.

The Day Ahead

For the EUR

It’s a busier day ahead on the economic calendar. Industrial production and wage growth figures for the Eurozone are due out later today. Expect industrial production to have the greater influence on the EUR.

Finalized inflation figures for Italy and France are also due out but should have a muted impact on the EUR.

At the time of writing, the EUR was up by 0.03% to $1.1807.

For the Pound

It’s another busy day ahead on the economic calendar. Inflation figures for August are due out later this morning.

With the markets looking ahead to the BoE monetary policy decision next week, expect today’s figures to be key.

A further pickup in inflationary pressures may force the BoE to make a sooner rather than later move to curb the upward trend in consumer prices.

At the time of writing, the Pound was down by 0.11% to $1.3795.

Across the Pond

It’s another relatively busy day ahead. NY Empire State Manufacturing and industrial production figures will be the key stats of the day.

Import and export price index numbers are also due out but should have a muted impact on the Greenback and the broader markets.

At the time of writing, the U.S Dollar Spot Index was up by 0.02% to 92.641.

For the Loonie

It’s a relatively busy day ahead for the Loonie.

Inflation figures for August are due out later today. With inflation a key area of focus, expect plenty of influence from the numbers.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was down by 0.08% to C$1.2704 against the U.S Dollar.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Dollar Falters After U.S. Inflation Rise Eases, Safe-Haven Yen, Franc Up

Several Fed officials have suggested the U.S. central bank could reduce its buying of debt securities by the end of the year, but said an eventual interest rate hike would not happen for some time.

The Fed will hold a two-day monetary policy meeting next week, with investors keen to find out whether a tapering announcement will be made.

Tapering tends to benefit the dollar as it suggests the Fed is one step closer toward tighter monetary policy. It also means the central bank will be buying fewer debt assets, effectively reducing the number of dollars in circulation.

Data on Tuesday showing the U.S. consumer price index, excluding the volatile food and energy components, edged up just 0.1% last month has raised doubts about tapering this year, some analysts said.

August’s core CPI rise was also the smallest gain since February and followed a 0.3% rise in July. The so-called core CPI increased 4.0% on a year-on-year basis after gaining 4.3% in July.

“The softer inflation prints caused investors to push back on bets that the Fed could move sooner to taper bond purchases. Easing inflation would take the heat off the Fed to move prematurely,” said Fiona Cincotta, senior financial markets analyst at City Index.

She also cited U.S. core producer prices (PPI) data for August released last week, which also rose at a slower pace. Excluding the food, energy and trade services elements, producer prices rose 0.3% last month, the smallest gain since last November. The so-called core PPI shot up 0.9% in July.

“So the evidence does appear to be building that peak inflation has passed. That said, supply chain bottlenecks are expected to persist for a while so it’s unlikely that either PPI or CPI will drop dramatically or rapidly,” Cincotta added.

In afternoon trading, the dollar index was slightly down at 92.601, moving away from a more than a two-week high on Monday.

The euro was flat against the dollar at $1.1807.

Risk appetite soured on Tuesday as well, with Wall Street shares down while U.S. Treasury prices were up sharply, pushing yields lower.

Investors looked past decelerating inflation and focused on uncertainties about U.S. growth now clouded by the economic impact of the Delta variant.

Against the safe-haven Swiss franc, the dollar dropped 0.4% to 0.9189 francs.

Versus another safe-haven, the Japanese yen, the dollar fell 0.4% to 109.615 ye

In other currencies, the Australian dollar fell to a two-week low after Reserve Bank of Australia Governor Philip Lowe painted a very dovish policy outlook with no rate hikes on the horizon until 2024.

The Aussie dollar was last down 0.7% at US$0.7319. In cryptocurrencies, bitcoin was last up 3.1% at $46,400 . Ether changed hands at $3,344, up 1.9%.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

(Reporting by Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss in New York; Additional reporting by Saikat Chatterjee in London and Shreyashi Sanyal in Bengalaru; Editing by Nick Zieminski and Paul Simao)

 

USD/CAD: Loonie Strengthens as U.S. Inflation Weighs on the Greenback

The Canadian dollar strengthened against its U.S. counterpart on Tuesday as weaker U.S. inflation data weighed on the U.S. dollar.

The USD/CAD pair fell to 1.2596 today, down from Monday’s close of 1.2651. The Canadian dollar lost over 1.2% last month and has depreciated about 0.3% so far this month.

USDCAD strengthened a bit more than we expected last week, peaking nearer the mid-1.27s whereas we had anticipated better resistance a big figure lower.  There is still a lot of chop in this market – witness the sharp rally in the USD last Friday and the lack of follow-through interest (so far) today.  We note that the sideways trading range shows signs of persisting on the face of it, although the undertone remains more USD-bullish, based on the positive alignment of trend strength signals on the daily and weekly DMI oscillators,” noted Shaun Osborne, Chief FX Strategist at Scotiabank.

“The session started with the intraday DMI also in USD-bullish territory but the signal has faded to neutral at writing.  Broadly, we are leaning bullish on the outlook for USDCAD—the trend higher since the early June low is intact and supported by positive DMI signals—but conviction here is suitably low.  Support remains 1.2595 (40-day MA at 1.2593 today).  Resistance is 1.2760 ahead of a retest of 1.28+ levels.”

Inflation slowed in August after reaching its highest level in 13 years in July. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Tuesday that consumer prices rose 5.3% in the year ending in August, a slight drop from the 5.4% increase in June and July. This suggests inflation had topped out.

The dollar index, which measures the value of the dollar against six foreign currencies, was trading 0.14% lower at 92.599.

However, it is highly likely that the world’s dominant reserve currency, the USD, will rise by end of the year, largely due to the expectation of two rate hikes by the Fed in 2023. With the dollar strengthening and a possibility that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates earlier than expected, the USD/CAD pair may experience a rise.

Canada is the world’s fourth-largest exporter of oil, which edge higher on low U.S. output after Hurricane Ida. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were trading 0.53% higher at $70.81 a barrel. Higher oil prices lead to higher U.S. dollar earnings for Canadian exporters, resulting in an increased value of the loonie.

“The electoral campaign in Canada is set to remain in focus with only 10 days to go before the vote, and we think that CAD is currently discounting some political risk as opinion polls show neither of the two major parties (Liberals and Conservatives) as likely to secure a full majority in the House,” noted Francesco Pesole, FX Strategist at ING.

“Next week, CPI data will be the main highlight and another above-consensus read may further support hawkish expectations on the BoC, but once again, political risk may cap CAD gains for now. Once political uncertainty dissipates, a short-term undervaluation vs USD (2.1%, according to our fair value model) and solid fundamentals all point to a rebound in the loonie, in our view.”

In August, Canada added 90,200 jobs, and the unemployment rate fell to 7.1%, its lowest level since the Coronavirus pandemic began. The data might support the Bank of Canada’s next taper in October. The Governor of the Bank of Canada, Tiff Macklem, said on Thursday that Canada is on its way to no longer needing quantitative easing to stimulate the economy.

Last week, the Bank of Canada held its key interest rate, citing fears that the pandemic and supply bottlenecks might stall the economic recovery. The central bank has maintained its overnight rate target at 0.25% and said it will continue buying bonds at a rate of $2 billion a week as part of its quantitative easing program.

Economic Data Puts the Pound and the Greenback in the Spotlight

Earlier in the Day:

It was a busier start to the day on the economic calendar this morning. The Aussie Dollar was in action in the early hours. Later this morning, finalized industrial production figures are also due out of Japan. Barring a marked revision from prelim figures, however, we don’t expect the production numbers to influence.

For the Aussie Dollar

House prices and business confidence were in focus this morning.

In the 2nd quarter, house prices were up 6.7%, quarter-on-quarter versus a forecasted 6.0% increase. House prices had risen by 5.4% in the previous quarter.

Of greater significance, however, were business confidence figures.

In August, the NAB Business Confidence Index increased from -8 to -5.

According to the August Survey,

  • Business conditions rose by 4 points to +14 after having seen marked declines for 2 consecutive months.
  • In spite of the pickup in confidence, the confidence index remained in the deep red, highlighting the economic uncertainty stemming from lockdown measures.
  • While confidence and conditions have taken a hit, current levels remain well above those seen back in 2020, however.

The Aussie Dollar moved from $0.73682 to $0.73638 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Aussie Dollar was down by 0.06% to $0.73635.

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was down by 0.06% to ¥110.060 against the U.S Dollar, with the Kiwi Dollar down by 0.03% to $0.7117.

The Day Ahead

For the EUR

It’s a relatively quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. Finalized August inflation figures for Spain are due out later this morning.

Barring a marked upward revisions, however, we don’t expect the numbers to have a material impact on the EUR, however.

At the time of writing, the EUR was down by 0.03% to $1.1808.

For the Pound

It’s busy day ahead on the economic calendar. Average earnings, claimant counts, and unemployment figures will be in focus.

With the BoE in action next week, expect plenty of interest in the claimant counts and the unemployment rate.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.03% to $1.3842.

Across the Pond

It’s a relatively busy day ahead. August inflation figures are due out later today. With the FED seeing inflationary pressures as transitory, another spike would give the hawks the upper hand and the Dollar a nudge northwards.

Economists have forecast for the annual rate of core inflation to soften from 4.3% to 4.2%.

At the time of writing, the U.S Dollar Spot Index was up by 0.10% to 92.675.

For the Loonie

It’s a relatively quiet day ahead for the Loonie.

Manufacturing sales figures for July are due out later today. With little else for the markets to consider, we can expect some influence from the numbers, though the impact is unlikely to be long-lasting.

Market risk sentiment and crude oil prices will remain key as uncertainty over the economic recovery remains…

At the time of writing, the Loonie was down by 0.02% to C$1.2651 against the U.S Dollar.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.