Silver Price Daily Forecast – Silver Gets To New Highs

Silver Video 29.05.20.

Silver Continues Its Upside Move

Silver managed to get above the resistance at $17.50 and gained upside momentum. The move is supported by gold price upside and weaker U.S. dollar.

Gold has managed to settle above $1700 per ounce as the increase in U.S. – China tensions drives demand for safe haven assets.

Gold/silver ratio has firmly settled below 100 and continues to decline. Before the coronavirus crisis, gold/silver ratio was below 90, so a possible return to pre-crisis levels could be very beneficial for silver.

The U.S. dollar continues to lose ground against a broad basket of currencies despite its safe haven status, and the U.S. Dollar Index has already tested the 98 level. Weaker U.S. dollar is bullish for silver as it makes it cheaper for buyers who have other currencies.

In the near term, silver’s price action will heavily depend on the global market reaction to the upcoming news conference of the U.S. President Donald Trump where he is set to unveil new measures against China.

If the markets will be in a bearish mood following the news conference, the precious metal segment may gain additional upside momentum as investors will increase purchases of safe haven assets.

Technical Analysis

silver may 29 2020

Silver managed to get above $17.50 and has good chances to develop significant upside momentum. The recent peak in RSI is yet to be reached, so silver should not have problems with momentum given the right catalysts.

If this upside move continues, the next resistance is located at $18.15. In case silver manages to settle above $18.15, it will gain additional upside momentum and head towards resistance at $19.00.

This level will likely serve as a material obstacle on silver’s way up since it’s the pre-crisis high of 2020. In fact, silver has tried to test the $19.00 level two times this year, and each such attempt failed. The last time silver traded above $19.00 was back in September 2019.

On the support side, silver will continue to get significant support near $17.00. The support at this level was so strong that a move below it may signal a change of a near-term trend for silver.

In case silver gets below $17.00, the next support area is located between pre-crisis levels at $16.50 and the 20 EMA at $16.60.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Economic Data to Take a Back Seat with Trump’s News Conference the Main Event

Earlier in the Day:

It was a relatively busy day on the economic calendar this morning. The Japanese Yen and Aussie Dollar were in action early in the day.

Away from the economic calendar, the markets responded to Trump’s announcement on Thursday of plans to unveil measures against China at the news conference later today.

Fiscal stimulus from Brussels and the easing of lockdown measures across the EU and the U.S had provided support to riskier assets ahead of today’s open.

Looking at the latest coronavirus numbers,

On Thursday, the number of new coronavirus cases rose by 112,124 to 5,900,627. On Wednesday, the number of new cases had risen by 110,221. The daily increase was higher than both Wednesday’s rise and 106,139 new cases from the previous Thursday.

France, Germany, Italy, and Spain reported 5,612 new cases on Thursday, which was up from 1,892 new cases on Wednesday. On the previous Thursday, 1,976 new cases had been reported.

From the U.S, the total number of cases rose by 22,413 to 1,768,216 on Thursday. On Wednesday, the total number of cases had risen by 20,392. On Thursday 21st May, a total of 28,089 new cases had been reported.

The uptick on Thursday will need to be monitored in the coming days. With the easing of lockdown measures now in the 4th week, it would be in the coming days that a 2nd wave would become evident…

For the Japanese Yen

Inflation was in focus in the early part of the day, along with industrial production and retail sales figures.

In May, the Ku-area of Tokyo saw inflationary pressures return, with core consumer prices rising by 0.20% In April, consumer prices had fallen by 0.10%, year-on-year.

According to the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication.

  • Rising prices for clothes & footwear (+1.7%), furniture & household utensils (+1.7%), and culture & recreation (+1.2%) supported the rise.
  • There were also increases in prices for medical care (+0.8%) and housing (+0.7%).
  • Prices for Education (-8.9%) and fuel, light, & water charges (-1.9%) pinned back inflationary pressures, however.
  • There were also declines in prices for transport & communication (-0.1%) and miscellaneous (-0.8%).

In April, industrial production slumped by 9.1%, based on prelim numbers, following a 3.7% decline in March. Economists had forecast a 5.1% slide.

According to the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry,

Industries that mainly contributed to the decrease were:

  • Motor vehicles, iron, steel & non-ferrous metals, and transport equipment (excl. motor vehicles).

Industries that mainly contributed to the increase were:

  • Production machinery.

Forecasts for May were not much better, with the forecast for industrial production revised from -1.4% to -4.1%. For June, however, forecasts are for production to rise by 3.9%.

Retail sales also disappointed in April, with lockdown and social distancing measures weighing.

According to the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry, retail sales tumbled by 13.7% in April, year-on-year, following a 4.7% slide in March. Economists had forecasts an 11.50% decline.

The Japanese Yen moved from ¥107.701 to ¥107.608 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was down by 0.22% to ¥107.41 against the U.S Dollar.

For the Aussie Dollar

Private sector credit stalled in April, following a 1.10% increase in March.

According to figures released by RBA,

  • Business credit rose by 0.1%, following a 3.1% rise in March.
  • Personal credit slid by 3.0%, following a 1.4% decline in March.
  • Housing credit rose by 0.2%, which was down from a 0.3% rise in March.

The Aussie Dollar moved from $0.66312 to $0.66315 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Aussie Dollar was up by 0.08% at $0.6642.

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Kiwi Dollar was down by 0.11% to $0.6203.

The Day Ahead:

For the EUR

It’s a busy day ahead on the economic calendar. Key stats include French and German retail sales figures for April and the Eurozone prelim inflation numbers for May.

Prelim inflation figures for France and Italy and 2nd estimate GDP numbers for France are also due out.

We will expect the numbers to have a muted impact on the EUR, however. The EU’s recovery plan and the continued easing of lockdown measures remain positives.

While COVID-19 news and updates remain EUR positive, the markets will need to monitor the number of new cases. On Thursday, there was an uptick. If an upward trend begins, this could question member state plans to ease lockdown measures further.

From the early part of the day, it was risk aversion that pinned back the EUR as the markets await Trump’s news conference later today.

At the time of writing, the EUR was up by 0.07% to $1.1085.

For the Pound

It’s yet another quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out to provide the Pound with direction.

Through the day, expect market risk sentiment and any Brexit chatter to be key drivers.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.01% to $1.2322.

Across the Pond

It’s another busy day ahead on the U.S economic calendar. Economic data includes April inflation and personal spending figures and May consumer sentiment and Chicago PMI numbers.

Expect the May figures to have the greatest influence, with the markets likely to brush aside April numbers.

Outside of the numbers, FED Chair Powell is scheduled to speak. Any commentary on the U.S economy and monetary policy will garner plenty of attention.

The main event of the day, however, is Trump’s news conference. What does the U.S President have in store for China?

The Dollar Spot Index was up by 0.02% to 98.407 at the time of writing.

For the Loonie

It’s also a busy day on the economic calendar. Key stats include 1st quarter GDP numbers and April’s RMPI.

Expect the GDP figures to have some influence, though the markets are expecting some quite dire numbers. Anything better than forecast should be Loonie positive…

Crude oil prices and market risk sentiment will be the key driver on the day, however.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was down by 0.10% to C$1.3777 against the U.S Dollar.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

U.S Weekly Jobless Claims to Put the Greenback in Focus as Geopolitical Risk Lingers

Earlier in the Day:

It was a relatively busy day on the economic calendar this morning. The Aussie Dollar and Kiwi Dollar were in action once more.

Away from the economic calendar, the markets also responded to the moves across the EU and the U.S from Wednesday.

Fiscal stimulus from Brussels and the U.S government’s moves to further reopen the economy provided both support for riskier assets early on. Market sentiment overshadowed economic data that remained weak while improving …

For the commodity currencies, however, concerns over rising tensions between the U.S and China did pin back any breakouts.

Looking at the latest coronavirus numbers,

On Wednesday, the number of new coronavirus cases rose by 110,221 to 5,788,503. On Tuesday, the number of new cases had risen by 95,878. The daily increase was higher than both Tuesday’s rise and 89,941 new cases from the previous Wednesday.

France, Germany, Italy, and Spain reported 1,892 new cases on Wednesday, which was up from 1,535 new cases on Tuesday. On the previous Wednesday, 3,225 new cases had been reported.

From the U.S, the total number of cases rose by 20,392 to 1,745,803 on Wednesday. On Tuesday, the total number of cases had risen by 19,185. On Wednesday 20th May, a total of 21,774 new cases had been reported.

For the Kiwi Dollar

Business Confidence improved in May, with the ANZ Business Confidence Index rising from an April -66 to a finalized -41.8. May’s prelim had come in at -46.

According to the latest ANZ Report,

  • A net 39% of firms expect weaker economic activity in their own business, with the retail sector the most pessimistic once more.
  • Employment intentions rose from a net 50.8% of firms intending to reduce employment to a net 42%.
  • Investment intentions improved marginally from a negative 45% to a negative 32%.
  • Profit expectations rose from a net 70.4% expecting lower profitability to a net 56%. The agricultural sector remained the weakest at -71%, with the construction sector the least negative at -42%.
  • Export intentions rose by just 6 points to -36.

The Kiwi Dollar moved from $0.61897 to $0.61840 upon release of the numbers. At the time of writing, the Kiwi Dollar was up by 0.05% to $0.6185.

For the Aussie Dollar

1st quarter private new capital expenditure fell by 1.6%, quarter-on-quarter, following a 2.8% fall in the 4th quarter. Economists had forecast a 2.6% decline.

According to the ABS,

  • While investments in building and structures fell by 1.1%, investments in equipment, plant, and machinery slid by 2.3%.
  • Year-on-year, total New CAPEX slid by 6.1%.
  • Investments in building and structures tumbled by 7.9%, with investments in equipment, plant, and machinery falling by 4.0%.

The Aussie Dollar moved from $0.66222 to $0.66282 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Aussie Dollar flat at $0.6622.

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was down by 0.13% to ¥107.86 against the U.S Dollar.

The Day Ahead:

For the EUR

It’s another relatively quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. Key stats include prelim May inflation figures from Germany and Spain.

Business and Consumer confidence figures out of Italy and the Eurozone should have a muted impact, following the EU’s COVID-19 recovery plan announced on Wednesday.

We will expect EU’s recovery plan and the continued easing of lockdown measures to provide support.

The markets will need to track any chatter from Beijing and Washington, however. Any rise in tensions and action from either side will test risk appetite on the day.

At the time of writing, the EUR was up by 0.11% to $1.1018.

For the Pound

It’s yet another quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out to provide the Pound with direction.

On Wednesday, we saw the Pound take a hit in response to the threat of the BoE cutting interest rates into negative territory.

BoE Chief Economist Haldane had attempted to pour cold water on such a prospect but to no avail.

Through the day, expect market risk sentiment and any Brexit chatter to be key drivers.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.05% to $1.2267.

Across the Pond

It’s a busy day ahead on the U.S economic calendar. Economic data includes April durable goods, 2nd estimate GDP numbers, and pending home sales figures for April.

Barring any deviations from 1st estimates, expect April’s core durable goods orders to garner some attention.

Any moves in response to the durable goods orders are likely to be limited, however. The market focus will be on the weekly jobless claims figures.

There’s plenty of optimism as the U.S economy continues to reopen, but whether the markets can stomach another 2m jump remains to be seen.

The Dollar Spot Index was down by 0.17% to 98.893 at the time of writing.

For the Loonie

It’s a quiet day on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out of Canada to influence the Loonie.

A lack of stats will leave the Loonie in the hands of market risk sentiment and the weekly EIA crude oil inventory numbers…

At the time of writing, the Loonie was down by 0.02% to C$1.3755 against the U.S Dollar.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

U.S. Dollar Index (DX) Futures Technical Analysis – In Position to Post Closing Price Reversal Bottom

The U.S. Dollar is trading higher against a basket of major currencies late Wednesday after reversing earlier weakness. After feeling some early session selling pressure, the greenback was able to stabilize and move higher against the Euro, British Pound, Canadian Dollar and Japanese Yen.

The move against the Euro came about even as the common currency remained supported by news of a proposal for an economic recovery package to help the Euro Zone region recover from the coronavirus pandemic.

Sterling retreated below $1.2300 as investor focus shifted back to the possibility of negative interest rates in Britain and comments from government officials that not much progress had been made in Brexit negotiations.

Worries about the U.S. response to China’s proposed security law for Hong Kong helped drive U.S equity indexes lower during the cash market session, which in turn increased the U.S. Dollar’s appeal as a safe-haven asset. This move led to lower demand for the Japanese Yen.

At 19:16 GMT, the June U.S. Dollar Index is trading 99.240, up 0.334 or +0.34%.

Daily June U.S. Dollar Index

Daily Swing Chart Technical Analysis

The main trend is down according to the daily swing chart. A trade through the intraday low at 98.715 will signal a resumption of the downtrend, while a move through the 98.345 swing bottom will reaffirm the downtrend.

The minor trend is also down. A trade through 99.995 will change the minor trend to up. This will also shift momentum to the upside.

The main range is 94.530 to 103.960. Earlier today, the index attracted buyers when it tested its retracement zone at 99.245 to 98.130.

Daily Swing Chart Technical Forecast

Based on the early price action and the current price at 99.240, the direction of the June U.S. Dollar Index into the close on Wednesday is likely to be determined by trader reaction to yesterday’s close at 98.906.

Bullish Scenario

A sustained move over 98.906 will indicate the presence of buyers. This will also put the index in a position to form a potentially bullish closing price reversal bottom. If confirmed, this could trigger a 2 to 3 day counter-trend rally.

Overcoming the 50% level at 99.245 will indicate the buying is getting stronger. This could trigger a rally into the next 50% level at 99.690.

Bearish Scenario

A sustained move under 98.906 will signal the presence of sellers. This could trigger a test of the main bottom at 98.345, followed by the major Fibonacci level at 98.130.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Midweek Market Drivers: Global Expand Of COVID-19, Situation In Europe, and US-China Tensions

The number of new COVID-19 cases across the globe has exceeded 5 million.

How the situation is evolving in the European Union?

Aside from Spain, which has had 1 blip of over  1,000, we’ve seen the most adversely affected see sub-1,000 new cases each day for 9 consecutive days. The most affected being France, Germany, Italy, and Spain.

We had some concerns over how quickly governments were easing lockdown measures. When we factor in the 2-week incubation period, these numbers are fairly positive. They should give the markets some hope that a 2nd wave can be avoided.

Governments are about a 4-5 day period and about a week out to convince the more pessimistic…

If we look at China as a base case that should also be supportive.

We can then also look at virus vaccine news that has also been market positive late last week and early this week.

It appears that the coronavirus crisis continues to hit the global economy dramatically.

In the meantime, are there any improvements?

From the economic data, shifting through May and June numbers, the focus remains on employment and business and consumer confidence figures.

In Germany this week, we saw both business and consumer confidence improve, coming off the back the easing of lockdown measures.

The key, however, remains labor market conditions, which need to materially improve to drive confidence and consumption.

Expect these to be the key areas of focus and to drive the market near-term.

A pickup in consumption would drive a service sector recovery that would then filter through to the manufacturing sector.

Despite positive forecasts, the US-China conflict continues to be in the spotlight. Also, the Chinese government introduced a new HK Securities Law.

How did these events affect the markets?

There was some skepticism over the phase 1 trade agreement. We then saw accusations fly over the cause of the coronavirus pandemic leading to a deterioration in relations.

China has responded with the HK Securities Law and the U.S government is expected to respond in kind this week. This could include sanctions.

The markets have been almost Teflon in the early part of the week. On Wednesday morning, however, we saw risk appetite tested, as focus shifted back to the U.S – China tensions.

This shift in focus came as Trump announced that the U.S will respond to China’s plans for HK.

Let’s see what happens there. Beijing is not going to sit back this time around, not after the year-and-a-half that it took to come up with a phase 1 trade agreement.

Risk appetite will be tested. We do have COVID-19 news to keep the markets buoyed and there is also vaccine talk to provide support.

U.S China tensions, that relationship isn’t going to improve any time soon. Could you imagine a China-Russia alliance against the U.S and anyone else who wants to jump on Trump’s bandwagon?

That would certainly give the markets a rough time, particularly with Iran there in the Middle East as well.

It seems like the US-China tensions do not influence the markets significantly.

Meanwhile, is there anything else notable in regards to commodities and geopolitics?

Other than COVID-19, vaccines, and U.S China relations, there’s very little else to consider from a global financial market perspective.

There is one thing to consider, however, looking further down the track. Will the markets be as optimistic about the economic recovery once June stats begin to come out.

We saw May’s economic indicators show economic activity pickup from the depths of the abyss in April figures.

If we see June numbers fall off from May, then that optimism will come into question. May would have seen a larger pickup just due to the fact that economies were reopening.

I’m not convinced that the global economy will recover as quickly as the markets suggest. When you look at the equity markets and the rebound in the Aussie Dollar and Loonie. These are quite big moves when considering the doom and gloom ahead.

So, let’s see what happens when we begin to see June numbers…

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

China and Hong Kong Pressures are Having Limited Knock-on Effects

The spill-over into today’s activity has been minor. The heightened tensions weighed on China and Hong Kong markets, but Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and Indian equity markets rose.

Europe’s Dow Jones Stoxx 600 is higher for the third consecutive session, the longest streak this month. US shares are also trading higher, and the S&P 500 looks poised to rechallenge yesterday’s high, leaving yesterday’s opening gap unfilled. Benchmark bond yields are a little lower, and the US 10-year is hovering around 68 bp.

The greenback is bid against most of the major and emerging market currencies. Among the majors, the yen, the Canadian dollar, and New Zealand dollar are steady to higher, while the European complex, led by the Swiss franc, is nursing small losses. Turkey, Hungary, and South Africa led the losers among emerging market currencies.

The Chinese yuan (onshore and offshore) fell to its lowest level of the year. Gold drifted to two-week lows a little above $1700, while July WTI is consolidating in $33.50-$34.30 range as Russia seems to be balking at extending the maximum output cuts beyond next month.

Asia Pacific

President Trump is threatening “very interesting” action against China by the end of the week. Apparently, under consideration are a new set of sanctions against officials, businesses, and financial firms over the effort to crack down on dissent in Hong Kong.

There are actions the US could take, including limiting transactions and freezing assets. The US could suspend Hong Kong’s special trade privileges, but this seems potentially too disruptive for US companies and would punish Hong Kong more than China. Meanwhile, demonstrations and conflict with police have escalated in Hong Kong.

Pressure on the Hong Kong dollar is evident in the forward market. The 12-month forward points increased by almost 60 to 670. A week ago, they stood at 256. The 3-month forward points increased by almost 20 today to about 167. A week ago, they stood at 75.

Separately, the PBOC set the dollar’s reference rate at CNY7.1092, while the bank models implied CNY7.1144. However, the dollar rose to almost CNY7.1630 to approach the CNY7.1850 peak last September. The dollar rose to almost CNH7.1770 against the offshore yuan. It peaked last September near CNH7.1965. Chinese officials do not appear to cause the yuan’s weakness but are not resisting it forcefully.

Separately, China reported a 4.3% decline in April industrial profits, almost a third of the decline that the median forecasts in the Bloomberg survey anticipated and what seems like an improvement after the nearly 35% decline in Q1. However, the performance of the state-owned enterprises suggests a more complicated picture. Profits in this sector fell 46% in the January to April period, a little worse than the 45.5% decline reported in Q1.

Nevertheless, with the latest reserve requirement cuts for large banks, and additional efforts for small and medium businesses, and signs of more fiscal support coming from the National People’s Congress, China is stepping up economic and financial efforts. At the same time, Japan’s cabinet has approved a JPY117 trillion supplemental budget with JPY72.7 trillion of fiscal outlays. South Korea is expected to deliver another 25 bp rate cut tomorrow (bringing the seven-day repo rate to 50 bp).

For the sixth consecutive session, the dollar stuck on the JPY107-handle. It has not traded below JPY107.30 since May 18. It neared JPY108 yesterday but backed off. Today there are $1.7 bln in options in the JPY107.80-JPY107.90 area that expire. If that is not a sufficient cap, there is another billion-dollar option at JPY108.15 that will also be cut. The Australian dollar is in a narrow range below yesterday’s high near $0.6675. There is an option for nearly A$635 mln at $0.6650 that expires today.

Europe

The European Commission appears to be combining the German-French proposal with the other proposal by Austria, Sweden, Denmark, and the Netherlands to advance a 750 bln euro fiscal support effort. It would include 500 bln euro in grants and 250 bln euros in loans.

It seems a popular meme to see an EU bond as a step toward the mutualization of debt and a fiscal union. This seems exaggerated. There are already common obligations, such as bonds issued by the European Stabilization Mechanism and the European Investment Bank. The EU itself has issued bonds in the past.

ECB President Lagarde is laying the foundation for an increase in the central bank’s Pandemic Emergency Purchase Program next week. She cautioned today that the more mild scenario that had been considered was out of date and that the more likely scenario is the one that anticipates an 8-12% contraction this year.

The internal debate seems to be over relaxing more of the self-imposed limits. The capital key has already been diluted for PEPP, and the issue limit of 1/3 has also been waved. There does not seem to be much interest in taking rates deeper into negative territory.

There has been much discussion of the Bank of England adopting negative rates. We have understood officials to be keeping that option on the table, which may help lower UK rates, such as last week’s 3-year Gilt auction that resulted in a negative yield.

However, it does not seem to be imminent. More likely, the Bank of England will increase its bond purchases when it meets on June 18. The BOE’s chief economist, Haldane’s comments, were consistent with the idea that other policy options will be explored before negative rates.

The euro initially slipped to almost $1.0930 after stalling in front of $1.10 yesterday. However, with a running start in the European morning, the euro punched above $1.10 and above last week’s high to poke above the 200-day moving average (~$1.1015) for the first time since the end of March.

The $1.1050 area may hold some offers, but there is little chart-based resistance ahead of $1.1160-$1.1200. Sterling, on the other hand, is firm but through late in the London morning, has been unable to surpass yesterday’s high near $1.2365. The next target above there is around $1.2425.

America

The US reports the May Richmond Fed survey and the Fed’s Beige Book for ahead of next month’s FOMC meeting. Nearly every survey (diffusion indices and sentiment surveys) have shown some moderation in the weakness since in April. The improvement has also mostly been better than expected. And yesterday’s it was reported that April new home sales, which were forecast to have imploded by nearly a quarter, eked out a small (0.6%) gain.

Yes, there is little doubt that the world’s biggest economy has suffered a large hit in this quarter, but the data suggests ideas of a Q3 recovered may not be misplaced. Other data, including traffic patterns, are also pointing to a slight pick up in activity as the lockdowns ease. Canada and Mexico’s calendars are light today. Banxico issues its inflation report today, and coupled with the strength of the peso may spur speculation of another 50 bp rate cut at its next meeting.

Although Fed officials have played down the likelihood of negative rate policy in the US and the fed funds futures curve is not implying negative rates, the central bank may not be done. There is more virtual ink being devoted to the possibility of yield curve control, where the Fed would not target a certain amount of Treasuries to be bought, as it is now ($5 bln a day down from $75 bln a day at the peak) but to target another rate.

The Bank of Japan targets the 10-year yield, and the Reserve Bank of Australia targets the three-year yield. If the Fed adopts such a tool, it would more likely target a short or intermediate coupon such as something between a two- and five-year maturity. It would help steepen the curve and send a signal that rates will remain low for some time.

The Canadian dollar joined the Australian dollar in breaking out of its recent range. The US dollar fell below the lower end of its two-month range against the Canadian dollar near CAD1.3850 yesterday. The losses are being extended today. The break of CAD1.38 is important from a technical perspective as it coincided with the halfway mark of this year’s range.

The next retracement objective is near CAD1.3600. More immediately, a bid in the European morning was found near CAD1.3730. The old support near CAD1.38 now offers resistance. The greenback is also pushing below the halfway mark of this year’s range against the Mexican peso (~MXN22.15). A break of MXN22 would set the sights on the MXN21.00-MXN21.10 area. Mexico is reporting a record increase in virus cases and related fatalities. The peso’s strength largely reflects the broader risk-on mood.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

The ECB and Brussels Put the EUR in Focus as Geopolitics Tests Risk Sentiment

Earlier in the Day:

It was a relatively busy day on the economic calendar this morning. The Aussie Dollar and Kiwi Dollar were in action, with economic data out of China also in focus.

Away from the economic calendar, the market’s attention returned to U.S – China tensions and China’s security law for HK.

COVID-19 news and numbers did remain supportive, however, with positive vaccine news hitting the news wires in the 1st half of the week.

Looking at the latest coronavirus numbers,

On Tuesday, the number of new coronavirus cases rose by 95,878 to 5,678,282 On Monday, the number of new cases had risen by 83,824. The daily increase was higher than both Monday’s rise and 94,189 new cases from the previous Tuesday.

France, Germany, Italy, and Spain reported 1,535 new cases on Tuesday, which was up from 747 new cases on Monday. On the previous Tuesday, 2,848 new cases had been reported.

From the U.S, the total number of cases rose by 19,185 to 1,725,411 on Tuesday. On Monday, the total number of cases had risen by 19,790. On Tuesday 19th May, a total of 20,688 new cases had been reported.

For the Kiwi Dollar

The RBNZ’s Financial Stability Report was in focus in the early hours.

Salient points from the latest report included,

  • COVID-19 has led to unprecedented economic disruption, with small businesses under stress.
  • Fiscal and monetary policy has cushioned the near-term impact. These include wage subsidies, large scale asset purchases to reduce interest rates, and a record low OCR.
  • Banks are in a strong position to support the economic recovery. The Reserve Bank has adjusted policies to enable banks to keep lending.
  • Measures include:
    • Mortgage deferrals for households and small businesses.
    • Delayed implementation of planned increases to capital requirements by a minimum of 12-months.
    • Eased core funding ratio requirements.
    • Supported the Business Finance Guarantee Scheme by creating a Term Lending Facility.

The Kiwi Dollar moved from $0.61971 to $0.61984 upon release of the report. At the time of writing, the Kiwi Dollar was up by 0.11% to $0.6192.

For the Aussie Dollar

Construction Work Done fell by 1.0% in the 1st quarter, following on from a 3.0% slide in the 4th quarter. Economists had forecast a 1.5% decline.

According to the ABS,

  • Residential work done fell by 1.6%, quarter-on-quarter, and slid by 12.5% when compared with the 1st quarter of 2019.
  • Total construction work down fell by 6.5% in the 1st quarter, year-on-year.

The Aussie Dollar moved from $0.66512 to $0.66530 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Aussie Dollar down by 0.11% to $0.6646.

Out of China

Industrial profit figures for April had little influence. Year-on-year, profits were down by 4.3%, following a 34.9% slump in March. Year-to-date, profits were down by 6.75%, following a 36.7% tumble in March.

The Aussie Dollar moved from $0.66512 to $0.66530 upon release of the figures.

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was up by 0.04% to ¥107.50 against the U.S Dollar.

The Day Ahead:

For the EUR

It’s a relatively quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. While there are no material stats due out of the Eurozone, the ECB and the EU Commission are in focus today.

In the early part of the European session, ECB President Lagarde is scheduled to speak. Expect any chatter on monetary policy or the economic outlook to influence. Lagarde’s speech precedes the release of the ECB’s Financial Stability Review. We will expect the review to be a key area of focus for the markets today.

With the ECB in focus early in the day, Brussels will also be in the spotlight. The European Commission is due to announce the COVID-19 Recovery Fund and EU Budget.

At the time of writing, the EUR was down by 0.10% to $1.0971.

For the Pound

It’s another quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out to provide the Pound with direction.

A lack of chatter on Brexit and the risk-on sentiment has provided the Pound with further support this week. Expect any updates on Brexit and COVID-19 to test this support, however.

At the time of writing, the Pound was down by 0.06% to $1.2327.

Across the Pond

It’s also a quiet day ahead on the U.S economic calendar. Following Tuesday’s consumer confidence figures, there are no material stats to influence later today.

A lack of stats leaves geopolitics center stage. On Tuesday, U.S President Trump stated that there would be a U.S response to China’s plans for HK by the end of the week… Measures could include sanctions on China…

The Dollar Spot Index was up by 0.14% to 99.042 at the time of writing, with the U.S – China jitters providing support.

For the Loonie

It’s a relatively quiet day on the economic calendar. Building permit figures are due out later today that will likely have a muted impact on the Loonie.

With concerns over the U.S – China relations and the prospects of sanctions on China resurfacing, we can expect the Loonie to be under pressure.

Much will depend on how Beijing will respond to any steps taken by the U.S government. The continued easing of lockdown measures across major economies, remains Loonie positive, however.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was down by 0.06% to C$1.3785 against the U.S Dollar.

U.S. Dollar Index (DX) Futures Technical Analysis – Testing Major Retracement Zone at 99.245 – 98.130

The U.S. Dollar is trading lower against all major currencies on Tuesday as growing optimism about a global recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic supported riskier currencies. The news also dampened the greenback’s appeal as a safe-haven currency.

The Euro rose against the U.S. Dollar as the mood among German exporters recovered somewhat in May after a “catastrophic” April, the first full month of coronavirus lockdown measures in Europe’s largest economy, the Ifo Institute said on Tuesday.

The British Pound moved higher on Tuesday, going above 1.2300 for the first time in 13 days, boosted mainly by improving global risk appetite which saw the dollar fall. Prime Minister Boris Johnson set out plans on Monday to ease Britain’s coronavirus lockdown, including restrictions on retail, if government tests are met.

The Sterling has been weighed down by Britain’s high COVID-19 death rate, the fact that the Bank of England is considering negative interest rates, and Brexit-related risks.

The commodity-linked Canadian Dollar strengthened to a two-month high against its U.S. counterpart on Tuesday as steps to reopen the world economy boosted investor sentiment. The price of oil, one of Canada’s major exports, was supported by growing confidence that producers are following through on commitments to cut supplies and rising fuel demand as coronavirus lockdowns ease.

At 15:22 GMT, June U.S. Dollar Index futures are trading 98.995, down 0.893 or -0.89%.

Daily June U.S. Dollar Index

Daily Swing Chart Technical Analysis

The main trend is down according to the daily swing chart. The trend turned down on Tuesday when sellers took out the last swing bottom at 99.005. A trade through 99.995 will change the main trend to up.

The main range is 94.530 to 103.960. The index is currently testing its retracement zone at 99.245 to 98.130. This zone is controlling the longer-term direction of the index.

The short-term range is 98.345 to 101.030. Its 50% level at 99.690 is resistance.

Daily Swing Chart Technical Forecast

Based on the early price action and the current price at 98.995, the direction of the June U.S. Dollar Index the rest of the session on Tuesday is likely to be determined by trader reaction to the main 50% level at 99.245.

Bearish Scenario

A sustained move under 99.245 will indicate the presence of sellers. Taking out 99.005 indicates the selling is getting stronger. This could trigger a break into another main bottom at 98.765.

If 98.675 fails then look for the selling to possibly extend into another main bottom at 98.345, followed by the major Fibonacci level at 98.130.

Bullish Scenario

Recapturing and sustaining a rally over 99.245 will indicate the return of buyers. This could lead to a retest of the short-term 50% level at 98.690, followed by the new main top at 99.995.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Who Needs China? Optimism and Hope Continue to Drive Riskier Assets Northwards

Onwards and upwards the global equity markets go and the commodity currencies are joining in on the rally.

Just 6-weeks ago, the Aussie Dollar was down at sub-$0.60 levels against the Greenback.

When considering the quite dire economic environment and the grim outlook, the broad-based recovery has been a remarkable one.

The bigger question that needs to be answered, however, is whether the latest breakout is sustainable.

The Here and Now

As we have moved beyond the 1st quarter and April economic indicators, the markets have formed a clear view.

May’s private sector PMIs suggested that the economic meltdown had bottomed out in April. Consumer confidence and business confidence figures have also shown that sentiment has picked up.

There’s one clear issue with the current sentiment, however.

While the U.S and China go back at it and the global supply chain remains broken, central banks and governments will be looking for a consumer-driven economic rebound.

In fact, when the news wires report of small firms leaving stimulus monies untapped, there must be some concern over what lies ahead.

At a minimum, there needs to be a marked bounce back in labor market conditions. That then needs to translate into consumption to fuel the merry-go-round.

The Good News

While there is so much uncertainty, the good news is that new coronavirus cases continue to head downwards. In key economies at least, with Asia and the EU impressing.

It is particularly poignant when considering the fact that we are now reaching that 2-week time-lapse since governments began introducing their lockdown measures, however.

At a minimum, this trend must continue in the next 1-2 weeks and with it, a successful treatment or vaccine.

Only then can the services sector truly expect a marked shift in outlook.

The Bad News

Trump could turn on China and the EU at any time and the China ball has already started rolling.

Throw in the EU, talk of a conflict with Iran and even the U.S severing ties with the Saudis and the geopolitical landscape may change forever.

As we have seen in the past, the markets don’t do too well to change. Just look at the effects of Brexit on the UK economy and the Pound.

So, for Trump there is the hope that, while the U.S economy may have seen its worst quarter since the Great Depression, the U.S equity markets continue to line voter pockets…

Today’s Market Moves

Today, we saw optimism overshadow U.S – China tensions and a gloomy economic outlook once again.

This may well continue should we see progress being made towards a COVID-19 vaccine or treatment drug.

Near-term, however, we will need to begin considering June figures to assess the speed of the economic recovery.

Today’s consumer confidence figures may be positive from a risk perspective. This is assuming that U.S consumer confidence does rise in spite of quite dire weekly jobless claims figures.

That leaves the markets exposed to a market shock, once we begin to digest June numbers…

Let’s face it, it would be almost a dream for labor market conditions, private sector activity, consumer consumption to bounce back to the end of 2019 levels…

At the time of writing, the EUR was up by 0.60% to $1.09603. Assuming that governments and central banks continue to throw money where it’s needed, we could even see $1.13 levels.

For the Aussie Dollar and Kiwi Dollar, we could see even greater gains…

It is a long way to fall though should that optimism shift in June, however.

26/05/20 EUR/USD Daily Chart

Fear is Still on Holiday

Equity markets have rebounded strongly. Nearly all the equity markets in the Asia Pacific region rose (India was a laggard) led by an almost 3% rally in Australia, which was seen as particularly vulnerable to the Sino-American fissure.

The Nikkei is approaching its 200-day moving average as it reached the best level since March 5. Europe’s Dow Jones Stoxx 600 is up around 1% after a 1.5% gain yesterday. It is at its best level since March 10.

The S&P 500 is set to gap sharply higher, above 3000, and its 200-day moving average for the first time since March 5. Benchmark 10-year bond yields are mostly firmer (US ~70 bp), but peripheral yields in Europe are softer, which is also consistent with the risk-on mood. Germany sold a two-year bond today with a yield of minus 66 bp and saw the strongest bid-cover in 13 years.

The dollar is heavy. Among the majors, the Antipodean and Norwegian krone lead the way. The yen is least favored and is struggling to gain in the softer dollar environment. Emerging market currencies are higher, led by more than 1% gains by the Mexican peso, South African rand, and Polish zloty. Gold is consolidating at softer levels (~$1725-$1735), while oil prices continue to recover. July WTI is probing the recent highs around $34 a barrel.

Asia Pacific

The risk-on mood has not been sparked by any sign of a thaw in the US-Chinese tensions. Indeed, the PBOC set the dollar’s reference rate against the yuan a little higher than the bank models suggested (CNY7.1293 vs. CNY7.1277). It was the second successive fix that was the highest since 2008. Still, the yuan snapped a three-day decline and rose less than 0.1%.

Legislation that makes it easier to crack down on dissent pressured Hong Kong, where the stock market fell more than 5.5% before the weekend, and forward points for the Hong Kong dollar exploded. The Hang Seng stabilized yesterday and gained more than 1.8% today. The 3-month and 12-month forward points are more than double what they were a week ago, but have eased from the extreme readings before the weekend. The situation is far from resolved despite the market moves.

The focus in Japan is on the government’s second supplementary budget for nearly JPY1 trillion. It could be approved by the Cabinet as early as tomorrow and would nearly double the government’s efforts. Japan is lifting the national state of emergency.

The dollar is firm against the yen but held just short of JPY108.00 (last week’s high was ~JPY108.10). There is an option for a little more than $400 mln struck at JPY107.90 that expires today. The market looks poised to challenge the highs in North America today. Note that the 200-day moving average is found near JPY108.35, and the greenback has not traded above it since mid-April.

The Australian dollar is punching above $0.6600 and is at its best level since March 9. Its 200-day moving average is found near $0.6660. The dollar peaked against the Chinese yuan at the end of last week near CNY7.1437. It rose against the offshore yuan on the same day near CNH7.1646, just below the high set on March 19.

Europe

The EU responded to Germany’s proposal to take at least a 20% equity stake (~9 bln euros) in Lufthansa by requiring it to give up some slots at airports in Frankfurt and Munich. Meanwhile, the larger focus is on the EC’s proposal for a recovery plan now that the German-French proposal has been countered by Austria, Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands.

However, the basis for a compromise does appear to exist in the form of some combination of grants, loans, and guarantees and in terms of access. With the European Stabilization Mechanism and the European Investment Bank issuing bonds for which there is a collective responsibility, we are not convinced that an EU bond is a step toward mutualization of existing debt or a fiscal union. In fact, such claims do little more than antagonize the opposition.

The ECB’s Pandemic Emergency Purchase Program (PEPP) has spent a little more than a quarter of its 750 bln euro facility in the first two months. Hints from some officials suggest that this could be expanded as early as next week when the ECB meets. At the current pace, PEPP will be out of funds toward the end of Q3 or early Q4. Talk in the market is that a 250-500 bln euro expansion is possible.

The political controversy of UK’s Cummings violation of the lockdown seems to have little impact for investors. Sterling, the worst performing of the major currencies this month, is bouncing back smartly today, and while the UK stock market was closed yesterday, it is playing a little catch-up today. The benchmark 10-year Gilt yield is a few basis points higher, but faring better than German Bunds and French bonds (where the 10-year yield is now back into positive territory, albeit slightly).

The euro has bounced a full cent from yesterday’s low near $1.0875. The market has its sights on last week’s high just shy of $1.1010 and the 200-day moving average a little above there. The euro has not traded above its 200-day moving average since the end of March. Above there, the $1.1065 area corresponds to about the middle of this year’s range. Sterling is near its best level in a couple of weeks.

After finding support near $1.2160 in the past two sessions, it bounced to about $1.2325 today to toy with the 20-day moving average (~$1.2315). The short-covering rally has stretched the intraday technical readings, and it may be difficult for the North American session to extend the gains very much before some consolidation.

America

The US reports some April data (Chicago Fed’s National Economic Activity Index) and new home sales. The reports typically are not market-movers even in the best of times. Moreover, it is fully taken on board that the economy was still imploding. May data is more interesting. The Dallas Fed’s manufacturing survey and the Conference Board’s consumer confidence surveys will attract more attention and are expected to be consistent with other survey data suggesting the pace of decline is moderating. This is thought to be setting the stage for a recovery in H2.

Canada’s economic diary is light today, and Mexico is expected to confirm that Q1 GDP contracted by 1.6%. Yesterday Mexico surprised by with a nearly $3.1 bln trade April deficit. The median forecast in the Bloomberg survey was for a $2 bln trade surplus. Apparently, none of the economists surveyed expected a deficit. Exports fell by nearly 41%, and imports tumbled by 30.5%. Many economists are revising forecast for Mexico’s GDP lower toward a double-digit contraction this year.

Nevertheless, the peso is flying. It is the strongest currency here in May. The 1.75% gain today brings the month’s advance to a dramatic 9%+ gain. The US dollar is near MXN22.10, giving back about half of this year’s appreciation. A break of the MXN22.00 area would target the MXN21.30 area.

The intraday momentum indicators are stretched. The US dollar is heavy against the Canadian dollar as well. It is approaching the lower end of its two-month trading range near CAD1.3850. The next important chart point is around CAD1.3800. Here too, the greenback’s slide in Asia and Europe is leaving intraday technicals indicators stretched as North American dealers resume their posts.

For a look at all of today’s economic events, check out our economic calendar.

Economic Data Puts the EUR and the Greenback in Focus as Risk Appetite Builds

Earlier in the Day:

It was a relatively quiet day on the economic calendar this morning. The Kiwi Dollar was in action, with April trade figures in focus.

Away from the economic calendar, the markets continued to monitor HK and the U.S reaction to China’s security law. Progress of the bill to make it more difficult for Chinese companies to list on U.S exchanges and China’s response also remains a factor.

COVID-19 news and numbers, however, remained supportive, driving market optimism and demand for riskier assets.

Looking at the latest coronavirus numbers,

On Monday, the number of new coronavirus cases rose by 83,824 to 5,582,404. On Sunday, the number of new cases had risen by 101,608. The daily increase was lower than Sunday’s rise, while higher than 82,564 new cases from the previous Monday.

France, Germany, Italy, and Spain reported just 747 new cases on Monday, which was down from 1,470 new cases on Sunday. On the previous Monday, 1,916 new cases had been reported.

From the U.S, the total number of cases rose by 19,790 to 1,706,226 on Monday. On Sunday, the total number of cases had risen by 20,190. On Monday 18th May, a total of 22,231 new cases had been reported.

For the Kiwi Dollar

On the trade front, the trade deficit narrowed from a NZ$3,460m to NZ$2,500m in April. The monthly trade surplus jumped from NZ$722m to a record NZ$1,267m.

According to NZ Stats,

  • The total value of goods exports decreased by NZ$220m (4.0%) from April 2019 to hit NZ$5.3bn.
    • A fall of NZ$211m (-69%) in the export of logs pinned back exports in April.
    • The slide in log exports, however, was offset by a NZ$202m (29%) jump in milk powder exports.
    • Kiwi fruit exports also continued to support, with a NZ$116m (37%) rise compared with April 2019.
    • Compared with April 2019, exports to Japan and the U.S increased, while exports to China, the EU, and Australia slumped.
  • Goods imports in April 2020 slid by NZ$1.1bn (-22%) to NZ$4.0bn, marking the 2nd largest decline on record.
    • A sharp slide in petroleum and products of NZ$352m (-58%) contributed to the slump in imports.
    • The imports of crude oil fell by NZ255m (77%), with petrol and diesel imports falling by NZ$97m (35%).

The Kiwi Dollar moved from $0.61011 to $0.60992 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Kiwi Dollar was up by 0.29% to $0.6121.

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was down by 0.14% to ¥107.86 against the U.S Dollar, while the Aussie Dollar was up by 0.24% to $0.6561.

The Day Ahead:

For the EUR

It’s a relatively quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. Germany remains in focus, with May’s GfK Consumer Climate figures due out later this morning.

Expect some influence from the numbers, which will give some indication of whether a service sector-driven economic recovery is feasible near-term.

Global trade terms remain weak, which will likely shift focus to service sector activity near-term. Consumer confidence and consumption will be pivotal in any economic recovery.

At the time of writing, the EUR was up by 0.11% to $1.0910.

For the Pound

It’s another quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. Following Monday’s holiday, expect Brexit and COVID-19 news updates to be the key drivers on the day.

Will there be a surprise decision to agree to a Transition period extension? The current economic environment would support such a move. It would be hard to imagine voters complaining when considering the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the UK economy.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.14% to $1.2208, with risk sentiment providing support.

Across the Pond

It’s also a relatively busy day ahead on the U.S economic calendar. Following Monday’s public holiday, May’s consumer confidence figures are due out later today.

A marked pickup would be needed in confidence to support a more optimistic economic outlook. Weekly jobless claims figures suggest that, while an easing of lockdown measures is positive, labor market conditions will weigh.

April’s new home sales and March house prices figures also due out should have a muted impact later today.

Away from the calendar, chatter from the Oval Office and any progress with the bill to toughen rules on Chinese firms listing on U.S exchanges will also influence. There’s also any U.S response to China’s plans for the HK security law to also monitor.

The Dollar Spot Index was down by 0.18% to 99.687 at the time of writing.

For the Loonie

It’s a quiet day on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out of Canada to provide the Loonie with direction.

Geopolitics and improved market sentiment towards the economic outlook will likely remain the key drivers.

Overnight BoC Governor Poloz spoke of inflation likely to take some time to return to target. Poloz added that the BoC has some flexibility in the time it takes to get inflation back to target. The comments suggested that there would be no monetary policy moves to fuel inflationary pressures.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was up by 0.17% to C$1.3961 against the U.S Dollar.

Economic Data Puts the EUR in Focus, with Geopolitics and COVID-19 to also Influence

Earlier in the Day:

It was a particularly quiet day on the economic calendar this morning. There were no material stats out through the Asian session to provide any direction.

A lack of stats left the markets in the hands of chatter from the weekend and the latest COVID-19 news and numbers.

At the end of last week, news had hit the wires of China’s security law heading for Hong Kong, leading to some caution through the Asian markets.

Strong words from both the U.S and China as tensions have built tested market risk appetite early on.

While the rise in tension is certainly a concern, positive updates from COVID-19 vaccine trials provided support to riskier assets early on. The positive news was coupled with a continued downward trend in new coronavirus cases across the EU and the U.S.

Looking at the latest coronavirus numbers,

On Sunday, the number of new coronavirus cases rose by 100,455 to 5,497,427. On Saturday, the number of new cases had risen by 99,013. The daily increase was higher than both Saturday’s rise and 83,321 new cases from the previous Sunday.

France, Germany, Italy, and Spain reported 1,470 new cases on Sunday, which was down from 1,658 new cases on Wednesday. On the previous Sunday, 2,500 new cases had been reported.

From the U.S, the total number of cases rose by 20,190 to 1,686,436 on Sunday. On Saturday, the total number of cases had risen by 21,152. On Sunday 17th May, a total of 19,891 new cases had been reported.

The Majors

At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was down by 0.01% to ¥107.65 against the U.S Dollar, with the Aussie Dollar down by 0.08% to $0.6532. The Kiwi Dollar was up by 0.01% to $0.6095.

The Day Ahead:

For the EUR

It’s a relatively busy day ahead on the economic calendar. Germany is back in focus, with 2nd estimate GDP numbers and May’s IFO Business Climate Index figures due out.

Barring a marked downward revision to the GDP numbers, the IFO figures will likely have the greatest influence.

As lockdown measures ease through May, the markets will be looking for a pickup in both business and consumer confidence.

Away from the economic calendar, expect the news wires to also influence. China and the U.S will be in focus as will any chatter from Brussels and EU member states on the COVID-19 recovery fund.

At the time of writing, the EUR was down by 0.02% to $1.0899.

For the Pound

It’s a quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out of the UK to provide the Pound with direction, with the UK markets closed.

A lack of stats leaves the Pound in the hands of Brexit and COVID-19 updates, both of which remain Pound negative.

While an easing in lockdown measures is positive, the continued spread of the virus across the UK has led to a delay of a more widespread opening of the economy.

With the UK’s neighbors taking more aggressive steps to ease lockdown measures, the UK economic recovery will likely trail behind those of the EU and the U.S.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.10% to $1.2185.

Across the Pond

It’s also a quiet day ahead on the U.S economic calendar, with no material stats due out to provide the Dollar with direction. The U.S markets are closed, which will leave volumes on the lighter side.

A lack of stats will leave the Dollar in the hands of any chatter from Beijing and the Oval Office and COVID-19 news…

The Dollar Spot Index was down by 0.08% to 99.787 at the time of writing.

For the Loonie

It’s a quiet day on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out of Canada to provide the Loonie with direction.

Expect risk sentiment to provide direction on the day. While the tension between the U.S and China was negative, progress towards a COVID-19 vaccine was positive early on.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was up by 0.01% to C$1.3997 against the U.S Dollar.

The Week Ahead – Geopolitics, Central Banks and COVID-19 in Focus

On the Macro

It’s a busy week ahead on the economic calendar, with 57 stats in focus in the week ending 22nd May. In the week prior, 57 stats had also been in focus.

For the Dollar:

It’s a relatively busy week ahead on the economic data front.

A quiet 1st half of the week leaves May consumer confidence figures in focus on Tuesday. The markets will be looking for a pickup in confidence as the government eases lockdown measures. A continued rise in jobless claims, however, may lead to softer than anticipated numbers.

In the 2nd half of the week, April durable goods orders and weekly jobless claims will be in focus on Thursday.

While the markets may be able to stomach a slide in durable goods order, the weekly jobless claims will need to slide back considerably.

At the end of the week, April inflation figures, personal spending, and May’s Chicago PMI will also be in focus.

Barring any downward revision, we would expect 2nd estimate GDP numbers to have a muted impact on Thursday.

Other stats in the week include the April housing sector and trade data and finalized Michigan consumer sentiment figures. Expect the markets to also brush these numbers aside in the week.

Outside of the numbers, we will expect chatter from Capitol Hill and COVID-19 numbers to remain key drivers. On the monetary policy front, FOMC members will also draw more attention. At the end of the week, FED Chair Powell delivers a speech to wrap things up.

The Dollar Spot Index ended the week down by 0.54% to 99.863.

For the EUR:

It’s another busy week ahead on the economic data front.

In the 1st half of the week, key stats include German business and consumer confidence figures and 2nd estimate GDP numbers on Monday.

Barring a downward revision from 1st estimates, expect the consumer and business confidence figures to have a greater impact.

The markets will then need to look ahead to a relatively busy Friday.

Key stats include German and French retail sales figures for April and 2nd estimate GDP numbers from France.

The data is unlikely to have a material impact on the EUR, however. With the Eurozone in lockdown throughout April, the markets should be able to look beyond any dire numbers.

Over the course of the week, prelim May inflation figures are also due out but will have little influence.

For the EUR, a continued easing in lockdown measures and a downward trend in new COVID-19 cases is a must.

From the ECB, ECB President Lagarde is due to speak on Wednesday ahead of the ECB Financial stability review. Expect EUR sensitivity.

The EUR/USD ended the week up by 0.75% to $1.0901.

For the Pound:

It’s a particularly quiet week ahead on the economic calendar.

There are no material stats due out of the UK to provide the Pound with direction.

A lack of stats will leave the Pound in the hands of Brexit and COVID-19 news updates.

We’ve seen the Pound under tremendous pressure as a result of the lack of progress on Brexit.

Boris Johnson has stated that, in spite of the lockdown, there would be no extension to the transition period. Based on progress to date, the chances of a hard Brexit have increased as a result. A change in stance by the British PM and the Pound would find support, else expect a reversal of last week’s gains.

Brexit news from the weekend was Pound negative…

The GBP/USD ended the week up by 0.47% to $1.2173.

For the Loonie:

It’s a relatively busy week ahead on the economic calendar.

For the Loonie, however, the markets will need to wait until Friday for economic data.

Key stats include 1st quarter GDP numbers and April’s RMPI.

We’ve seen GDP numbers from elsewhere. Will Canada see a similar contraction? Economists think so. It may be for that very reason that BoC Governor Poloz is scheduled to speak on Tuesday and Wednesday…

Away from the calendar, the upward trend in crude oil prices and a continued easing in lockdown measures remain Loonie positives. It remains to be seen whether crude can continue on the road to recovery, however.

Downside risks do remain. These include any signs of a 2nd wave pandemic and the U.S and China moving beyond words…

The Loonie ended the week up by 0.80% to C$1.3996 against the U.S Dollar.

Out of Asia

For the Aussie Dollar:

It’s another quiet week ahead for the Aussie Dollar.

Key stats include 1st quarter construction work done and private new CAPEX on Wednesday and Thursday.

On Friday, April private sector credit figures will also be in focus.

With the economy in meltdown going into April, however, we would expect the numbers to have a muted impact.

The RBA has talked of material contraction in the 2nd quarter, so don’t expect 1st quarter and April stats to do too much damage.

Expect COVID-19 updates and any U.S or China move to influence, however.

The Aussie Dollar ended the week up by 1.93% to $0.6537.

For the Kiwi Dollar:

It’s another relatively quiet week ahead on the economic data front.  Key stats include April trade figures on Tuesday and May business confidence figures on Thursday.

The RBNZ downplayed the market optimism in its last policy statement. That should limit any material upside for the Kiwi Dollar from the stats.

While trade data has stood up well considering the economic lockdown, will business confidence see some improvement?

Concerns over global trade terms and tourism will certainly be two major issues that businesses will continue to face.

Outside of the numbers, the RBNZ Financial Stability Report Wednesday will draw attention. The Kiwi will also be sensitive to any chatter or action from Beijing and Capitol Hill.

The Kiwi Dollar ended the week up by 2.68% to $0.6094.

For the Japanese Yen:

It’s a relatively busy week ahead on the economic data front.

The markets will need to wait until Friday for the numbers, however.

Key stats include May inflation figures and April industrial production and retail sales numbers.

With the Japanese government only just lifting the COVID-19 state of emergency, April figures are likely to be dire… There shouldn’t be too many surprises, however.

May inflation figures will also have little influence on the Yen. A pickup in crude oil prices will provide support but unlikely to be material, with consumption having tanked…

Outside of the numbers, risk sentiment will continue to influence, though it may be too soon for the Dollar to give up the safe-haven mantle…

The Japanese Yen ended the week down by 0.54% to ¥107.64 against the U.S Dollar.

Out of China

It’s another quiet week ahead on the economic data front. Economic data is limited to April’s industrial profits. No one is expecting any major rebound, which leaves the markets exposed to any accelerated decline…

Ultimately, the market focus will remain on COVID-19 news and moves by Beijing and Washington amidst the latest spat.

Beijing’s plans to impose a security law on HK will also need close monitoring… U.S President Trump has promised a strong U.S response to any such move.

The Chinese Yuan ended the week down by 0.39% to CNY7.1294 against the U.S Dollar.

Geo-Politics

UK Politics:

Brexit and lockdown measures remain the key areas of focus in the week ahead.

While the Pound found much-needed support last week, a lack of progress on Brexit will be an issue.

News hit the wires over the weekend of the EU beginning to prepare for a hard Brexit. This may price out the element of hope that has continued to support the Pound.

COVID-19 news will also be of influence, as the UK government struggles to contain the spread of the virus.

U.S Politics:

Rising tensions between the U.S and China will likely be a key driver in the week ahead.

If Trump signs the Bill to target Chinese companies, expect China to target U.S companies with heavy reliance on China…

The markets will also be watching to see how the U.S responds should China formally introduce the security law for HK.

The Coronavirus:

Easing measures will continue in the week.

We’ve yet to see a marked increase in the number of COVID-19 numbers across the EU or the U.S, though concerns will linger over what lies ahead. Some comfort will be taken from the fact that China reported zero new cases on Saturday.

From the market’s perspective, there are 3 key considerations that remain:

  1. Progress is made with COVID-19 treatment drugs and vaccines.
  2. The downward trend in new coronavirus cases continues.
  3. Governments continue to progress with the easing of lockdown measures.

All of this will need to translate into a marked decline in jobless claims and a pickup in consumer confidence and consumption… U.S Jobless claims figures released last week were disappointing, raising some doubt over how quickly the job markets will recover.

At the time of writing, the total number of coronavirus cases stood at 5,396,972, with the U.S reporting 1,666,246 cases to-date.

The Weekly Wrap – Optimism Delivered Riskier Assets a Boost as Lockdown Measures Eased

The Stats

It was a particularly busy week on the economic calendar, in the week ending 22nd May.

A total of 57 stats were monitored, following the 61 stats from the week prior.

Of the 57 stats, 28 came in ahead forecasts, with 25 economic indicators coming up short of forecast. 2 stats were in line with forecasts in the week.

Looking at the numbers, however, just 24 of the stats reflected an upward trend from previous figures. Of the remaining 33, 31 stats reflected a deterioration from previous.

For the Greenback, it was the 1st week in the red out of 3. The U.S Dollar Spot Index fell by 0.54% to end the week at 99.863. In the previous week, the Dollar had risen by 0.67%.

COVID-19 news, geopolitics, and central bank chatter continued to be key drivers in the week.

Looking at the latest coronavirus numbers.

The total number of coronavirus cases stood at 5,297,959, rising from last Friday’s 4,617,740 total cases. Week-on-week, the total number of cases was up by 680,119, on a global basis. This was higher than the previous week’s increase of 616,865 in new cases.

In the U.S, the total rose by 163,260 to 1,645,094. In the week prior, the total number of new cases had risen by 163,330.

Across France, Germany, Italy, and Spain combined, the total number of new cases increased by 19,110 to bring total infections to 872,494. In the previous week, the total number of new cases had risen by 29,514.

Out of the U.S

It was a relatively busy week on the economic calendar. On the economic calendar, however, the main area of focus was on the weekly jobless claims figures for the week ending 15th May.

Another 2.438m jump in jobless claims in the week tested risk sentiment and weighed on the Dollar.

While May’s prelim private sector PMIs were also out in the week, the numbers had a muted impact on the Dollar.

Housing sector conditions deteriorated drastically in April, by contrast, though much of this was attributed to the lockdown.

Existing new home sales slumped by 17.8%, in spite of U.S mortgage rates sitting at record lows.

FED Chair Powell had managed market expectations going into the week, talking of a slow economic recovery.

While the FOMC minutes and the FED Chair spoke of plenty of ammunition left to support the economy, rising tension between the U.S and China pressured the Dollar.

In the week, the House of Representatives passed a Bill to oust and ban Chinese companies from U.S exchanges.

China warned of retaliation and the rhetoric failed to ease over the course of the week.

In the equity markets, the Dow rose by 3.29%, with the NASDAQ and S&P500 gaining 3.44% and 3.20% respectively.

Out of the UK

It was a busy week on the economic calendar. April employment, inflation, and retail sales figures pinned the Pound back in the week.

A slower rate of contraction across the private sector failed to support a late rally in the Pound, with geopolitics in focus.

A lack of progress on Brexit and an extended lockdown were negatives for the Pound in the week. In spite of this, support kicked on off the back of Dollar weakness and hopes of a pickup in economic activity.

In the week, the Pound rose by 0.47% to $1.2173. The FTSE100 ended the week up by 3.90%, reversing a 2.29% loss from the previous week.

Out of the Eurozone

It was also a relatively busy week economic data front, with the stats skewed to the positive for once.

ZEW’s May economic sentiment and consumer confidence figures were in focus in the 1st half of the week.

In Germany and the Eurozone, economic sentiment amongst economists improved, with consumer confidence also improving across the Eurozone in May.

May’s prelim private sector PMIs also pointed to a possible bottoming out in April, which supported the EUR.

Positive stats, progress towards a COVID-19 recovery fund and a continued easing of lockdown measures delivered the upside in the week.

From the ECB, the monetary policy meeting minutes had a muted impact. There were no surprises, with the minutes continuing to call for fiscal support from member states.

For the week, the EUR rose by 0.75% to $1.0901, reversing a 0.18% loss from the previous week.

For the European major indexes, it was a bullish week. The DAX30 rallied by 5.82%, with the CAC30 and EuroStoxx600 gaining 3.90% and 3.63% respectively.

Elsewhere

It was a particularly bullish week for the Aussie Dollar and the Kiwi Dollar, with a Friday pullback being the only day in the red.

In the week ending 22nd May, the Aussie Dollar rose by 1.93% to $0.6537, with the Kiwi Dollar up by 2.68% to $0.6094.

For the Aussie Dollar

It was a particularly quiet week for the Aussie Dollar on the economic data front.

There were no material stats to provide the Aussie Dollar with direction. That left the Aussie Dollar in the hands of market risk sentiment and the RBA meeting minutes from Tuesday.

While the minutes painted a grim picture, however, upbeat sentiment towards an easing of lockdown measures delivered the upside.

The gains came in spite of rising tensions between the U.S and China. There was also talk of positive results in early COVID-19 vaccine trials…

For the Kiwi Dollar

It was a quiet week on the economic calendar.

Key stats included 1st quarter wholesale inflation and retail sales figures.

While the numbers were skewed to the negative, there was little interest in the Q1 figures.

Rising demand for commodities from China and an easing of global lockdown measures delivered the upside.

For the Loonie

It was a busy week on the economic calendar. Economic data was limited to March and April stats, however, that garnered little attention.

As expected, inflationary pressures eased further, with consumer prices on the slide in April.

The effects of COVID-19 were evident in March retail sales figures as well, which disappointed on Friday.

Ultimately, a jump in crude oil prices in the week, fueled by news of a jump in demand and falling output delivered the upside.

The markets are expecting demand to pick up as lockdown measures ease further. This was also positive for the Loonie in the week.

A sharp pullback on Friday limited the upside, however, as the Loonie slid back from C$1.38 levels.

The Loonie rose by 0.80% to end the week at C$1.3996.

For the Japanese Yen

It was a busy week on the data front. Key stats included 1st quarter GDP and April trade figures, and May private sector PMIs.

At the end of the week, April inflation figures were also in focus. It was a mixed bag on the data front, leaving the Yen in limbo.

While the economy contracted at a slower pace, trade data going into the 2nd quarter was particularly dire. Exports tumbled by 21.9%, with imports also in decline.

Private sector PMIs delivered little confidence on Thursday, with manufacturing sector activity contracting at a faster pace.

Adding more angst was the return of deflation in April, with core consumer prices falling by 0.2% year-on-year…

In spite of a pickup in market risk appetite in the week, the Yen failed to find support.

The Japanese Yen fell by 0.54% to end the week at ¥107.64. In the week prior, the Yen had fallen by 0.38% against the U.S Dollar.

Out of China

There were no stats in the week for the markets to consider. On the monetary policy front, the PBoC also left loan prime rates unchanged, leaving geopolitical risk in focus.

There was plenty to consider in the week as a Bill to oust Chinese firms from U.S exchanges progressed.

China responded with threats of its own before the news hit the wires on Friday of a new security law heading HK’s way. The law is set to ban acts against the government in a bid to end future protests. Unsurprisingly, the threat of more protests and riots weighed heavily on risk sentiment at the end of the week…

In the week ending 22nd May, the Yuan fell by 0.39% to CNY7.1294 against the Greenback.

The CSI300 and Hang Seng ending the week down by 2.27% and by 3.64% respectively. A Friday sell-off left the pair in the red as the markets responded to the news of China’s proposal to impose the security law on HK SAR.

U.S. Dollar Index (DX) Futures Technical Analysis – Trader Reaction to 99.69 Sets the Tone on Friday

The U.S. Dollar is trading higher against a basket of major currencies on Friday, extending yesterday’s gains, after U.S.-China tensions boosted demand for safe-haven currencies.

U.S.-China relations have been strained during the coronavirus pandemic. The U.S. has ramped up its criticism of China, blaming it for the spread of the virus, which originated in Wuhan.

At 09:32 GMT, June U.S. Dollar Index futures are trading 99.830, up 0.427 or +0.43%.

Last week, the U.S. government moved to block global chip supplies to blacklisted telecoms equipment maker Huawei Technologies. This week, the U.S. Senate also passed legislation that could prevent some Chinese companies from listing their shares on U.S. exchanges.

On Friday, renewed tensions between the U.S. and China following a new national security law in Hong Kong dented investor sentiment, sending investors into the safety of the U.S. Dollar.

Daily June U.S. Dollar Index

Daily Swing Chart Technical Analysis

The main trend is down according to the daily swing chart. A trade through 99.005 will signal a resumption of the downtrend. The main trend will change to up on a trade through 100.605.

The main range is 94.530 to 103.960. Its retracement zone at 99.245 to 98.130 is major support.

The short-term range is 98.345 to 101.030. Its 50% level at 99.690 is likely to act like a pivot today.

On the upside, the longer-term 50% level comes in at 101.495.

Daily Swing Chart Technical Forecast

Based on the early price action and the current price at 99.830, the direction of the June U.S. Dollar Index the rest of the session on Friday is likely to be determined by trader reaction to the short-term 50% level at 99.690.

Bullish Scenario

A sustained move over 99.690 will indicate the presence of aggressive counter-trend buyers. Investor sentiment is likely to drive the price action. There is minor resistance at 99.994. Overcoming this level will put the index in a position to challenge the main top at 100.605.

Bearish Scenario

A sustained move under 99.690 will signal the presence of sellers. This could trigger a quick break into the main 50% level at 99.245. If this fails to hold then look for the selling to possibly extend into the minor bottom at 99.005.

Retail Sales Put the Loonie and the Pound in Focus, as Geopolitical Risk Lingers

Earlier in the Day:

It was a relatively quiet day on the economic calendar this morning. The Kiwi Dollar and Japanese Yen were in action, with retail sales and inflation figures in focus.

Away from the economic calendar, the U.S government’s plans to ban Chinese companies from U.S Exchanges continued to be a test.

On the coronavirus front, a pickup in the number of new cases in the U.S may start to garner attention if the trend continues…

Looking at the latest coronavirus numbers,

On Thursday, the number of new coronavirus cases rose by 106,139 to 5,188,800. On Wednesday, the number of new cases had risen by 99,724. The daily increase was higher than both Wednesday’s rise and 93,671 new cases from the previous Thursday.

France, Germany, Italy, and Spain reported 1,976 new cases on Thursday, which was down from 2,856 new cases on Wednesday. On the previous Thursday, 4,230 new cases had been reported.

From the U.S, the total number of cases rose by 28,089 to 1,620,080 on Thursday. On Wednesday, the total number of cases had risen by 21,408. On Thursday, 14th May, a total of 26,397 new cases had been reported.

For the Kiwi Dollar

Retail sales fell by 0.7% in the 1st quarter, quarter-on-quarter, following a 0.70% increase in the 4th quarter. Core retail sales rose by 0.6%, quarter-on-quarter, following on from a 0.5% increase from the 4th quarter.

According to NZ Stats,

  • 8 of 15 industries had lower volume sales in the March quarter.
  • Motor vehicle and parts retailing tumbled by 7.5% to lead the way, with food and beverage services sales sliding by 6.7%.
  • Accommodation services saw a 9.3% slide, with clothing, footwear, and accessories down by 6.6%.
  • On the rise were supermarket and grocery store sales, which jumped by 8.5% to lead the way.

The Kiwi Dollar moved from $0.61236 to $0.61261 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Kiwi Dollar up by 0.10% to $0.6120.

For the Japanese Yen

In April, inflationary pressures vanished, with Japan seeing an annual rate of core deflation of 0.2%. In March, the annual rate of inflation had stood at 0.6%, according to figures released by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication. Economists had forecast an annual rate of core deflation of 0.1%.

Month-on-month, consumer prices fell by 0.2% in April after having stalled in March. The annual rate of inflation softened from 0.4% to 0.1%.

The Japanese Yen moved from ¥107.628 to ¥107.618 upon release of the figures. At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was down by 0.06% to ¥107.68 against the U.S Dollar

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Aussie Dollar was up by 0.05% to $0.6568.

The Day Ahead:

For the EUR

It’s a particularly quiet day ahead on the economic calendar. There are no material stats to provide the EUR with direction.

On the monetary policy front, the ECB monetary policy meeting minutes are due out later today and will draw some interest.

The markets will be looking for what the ECB has left to offer by way of support and whether there’s any tension in the camp…

Away from the economic calendar, expect the news wires to also influence. Renewed tensions between the U.S and China remains negative for the EUR, while the ongoing easing of lockdown measures are positive.

The number of new COVID-19 cases continues to sit at sub-1,000 levels across France, Germany, Italy, and Spain and it will need to stay that way.

The positive COVID-19 numbers together with the expectation of further fiscal support should limit any downside.

At the time of writing, the EUR was up by 0.02% to $1.0952.

For the Pound

It’s another relatively busy day ahead on the economic calendar. Key stats include April’s retail sales figures.

The markets are not expecting the numbers to provide the Pound with any support, with the UK in deep lockdown throughout April.

Brexit and COVID-19 news will remain the key drivers. The current week uptick will need to be accompanied by an easing in lockdown measures to support a breakout.

There have been plenty of concerns over the Government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. This has limited the government’s ability to ease lockdown measures.

A combination of negative Brexit updates and extended lockdown measures will likely continue to pin back the Pound.

At the time of writing, the Pound was up by 0.07% to $1.2232.

Across the Pond

It’s a quiet day ahead on the U.S economic calendar, with no material stats due out to provide the Dollar with direction.

A lack of stats will leave the Dollar firmly in the hands of chatter from Beijing and the Oval Office…

The Dollar Spot Index was up by 0.04% to 99.405 at the time of writing.

For the Loonie

It’s a relatively busy day on the economic calendar. Key stats include March retail sales figures.

Another slide in sales would pressure the Loonie, though any moves will likely be short-lived.

The continued global easing of lockdown measures and the rise in demand for crude remain positives for the Loonie.

On the downside, however, is the risk of another full-blown U.S – China trade war that could muddy waters.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was up by 0.06% to C$1.3946 against the U.S Dollar.

Private Sector PMIs and Jobless Claims Put the EUR, GBP, and USD in Focus

Earlier in the Day:

It was a relatively busy day on the economic calendar this morning. The Japanese Yen was in focus, with April trade and May prelim private sector PMIs giving the Yen direction.

Away from the economic calendar, the markets responded to the FOMC meeting minutes released overnight and the latest chatter from the U.S government.

Looking at the latest coronavirus numbers,

On Wednesday, the number of new coronavirus cases rose by 99,724 to 5,082,661. On Tuesday, the number of new cases had risen by 94,819. The daily increase was higher than both Tuesday’s rise and 89,941 new cases from the previous Wednesday.

France, Germany, Italy, and Spain reported 2,856 new cases on Wednesday, which was up from 2,848 new cases on Tuesday. On the previous Wednesday, 3,225 new cases had been reported.

From the U.S, the total number of cases rose by 21,408 to 1,591,991 on Wednesday. On Tuesday, the total number of cases had risen by 20,688. On Wednesday, 13th May, a total of 21,774 new cases had been reported.

For the Japanese Yen

It was a busy morning for the Japanese Yen, with April trade figures and prelim May private sector PMIs in focus.

In April, Japan’s trade balance slumped from a ¥5.4bn surplus to a ¥930.4bn deficit. Economists had forecast a deficit of ¥560.0bn.

According to figures released by the Ministry of Finance,

  • Exports tumbled by 21.9%, following on from an 11.7% slide in March.
  • Imports fell by 7.2%, following a 5% decline in March.

The Japanese Yen moved from ¥107.607 to ¥107.636 upon release of the figures that preceded private sector PMIs.

May’s private sector PMIs provided some idea of what the 2nd quarter is going to look like.

  • The manufacturing PMI fell from 44.1 to 38.4, while the services PMI increased from 19.5 to 25.3.

According to the prelim PMI Survey:

  • Output across the manufacturing sector saw a stronger decline, while service sector activity saw a weaker decline.
  • New orders were also mixed, with the manufacturing sector seeing new orders fall at a sharper pace.
  • The Manufacturing PMI fell to its lowest since March 2009, with sector output at its lowest in over 11-years.
  • While service sector activity improved marginally, the decline in output was still the 2nd sharpest on record.
  • New orders fell at a weaker pace, while employment fell at a more marked pace across the services sector in May.

The Japanese Yen moved from ¥107.673 to ¥107.684 upon release of the PMIs. At the time of writing, the Japanese Yen was down by 0.12% to ¥107.66 against the U.S Dollar

Elsewhere

At the time of writing, the Aussie Dollar was down by 0.62% to $0.6556, with the Kiwi Dollar down by 0.42% to $0.6119.

The Day Ahead:

For the EUR

It’s a particularly busy day ahead on the economic calendar. Putting geopolitical risk and COVID-19 aside, May’s prelim private sector PMIs are in focus.

While we would normally be eyeing the manufacturing numbers, service sector PMIs should garner more interest.

A marginally slower pace of contraction across the private sector and support from EU member states would be EUR positive.

The devil will be in the details, however. Headline numbers may be better, but if demand trails then don’t expect long-lasting support from the numbers.

At the time of writing, the EUR was down by 0.18% to $1.0960.

For the Pound

It’s a relatively busy day ahead on the economic calendar. Key stats include May’s prelim private sector PMIs.

With the UK still in lockdown, the numbers are unlikely to be too supportive for the Pound.

Expect the Services PMI to have a greater influence, with the PMI likely to linger at sub-20 levels.

Outside of the numbers, geopolitics will continue to be a factor, with Brexit in the limelight once more.

At the time of writing, the Pound was down by 0.39% to $1.2197.

Across the Pond

It’s a busy day ahead on the U.S economic calendar. Key stats include May’s prelim private sector PMIs for May, the weekly jobless claims, and the Philly FED Manufacturing Index figures for May.

Expect the service sector PMI and the initial jobless claims to have the greatest impact. The government has been easing lockdown measures in May. This will need to translate to a pickup in service sector activity and hiring…

Existing home sales figures for April will likely have a muted impact later in the session.

The Dollar Spot Index was up by 0.26% to 99.377 at the time of writing.

For the Loonie

It’s a quiet day on the economic calendar. There are no material stats due out to provide the Loonie with direction.

The lack of stats will leave the Loonie in the hands of market risk sentiment on the day. Expect the PMIs to influence.

At the time of writing, the Loonie was down by 0.25% to C$1.3936 against the U.S Dollar.

Mid-Week Themes – Hope Fuels Demand for Crude and Riskier Assets!

Usually, the third week of the month is a quiet one. However, it appears that there are geopolitical processes occurring that should be monitored.

There are Fed events on the economic calendar for this week. Could you comment on those?

It’s been a busy week for the FED Chair. Ahead of the Monday open, Powell provided the markets with assurances that the FED had plenty of ammo left to steer the U.S economy out of the current meltdown.

The markets then focused on Tuesday’s testimony, which was given alongside Mnuchin.

Powell gave the markets another dose of reality, stating that the U.S economy would unlikely to recover until the end of 2021.

Sunday’s speech had delivered riskier assets a boost, while Tuesday’s testimony weighed on risk appetite.

Mid-week, the focus is on the FOMC meeting minutes. Will there be any talk of negative rates? The markets will be looking for what’s in store and when the next move will come…

In reality, however, the FED may need to hold off until lockdown measures have been removed. An impact assessment of both fiscal and monetary policy delivered to date would be needed at a minimum.

The Markets appear to be looking at all the hints about the upcoming actions of the Fed, as forecasting those is a top priority.

Meanwhile, how are Crude Oil Prices doing?

It’s been another positive week for crude oil prices. At the start of the week, the news of an oil tanker armada heading for China delivered a boost.

An easing in lockdown measures has also provided crude with support along with the pullback in crude oil production.

Production had been at a record high ahead of the cut in output, however, which could become an issue down the road.

It’s been a great month, however, with WTI and Brent up by close to 50%. Prices are still down by close to 50% year-to-date, however.

There’s a long way to go, however. While lockdown measures continue to ease, demand globally will need to ramp up to deliver continued support.

In addition to Jerome Powell and the Fed, the market participants should watch out for a Trump announcement.

In the meantime, the coronavirus is still present and impacting the global economy. How is the easing of the lockdown going on?

 

The U.S government and member states have continued to ease lockdown measures in a bid to revive their respective economies.

Some have been able to make bolder moves, with Italy removing borders controls for people entering and leaving within the EU.

U.S President Trump has also remained adamant that the opening of the U.S economy is a must, irrespective of the impact on COVID-19 numbers.

It does remain to be seen, however, whether there will be a marked pickup in consumption, travel, and activity in general.

We can expect some caution near-term that will likely limit any material improvement in consumption.

It is a start, however, and at a minimum, the downward trend in new coronavirus cases will need to continue. This is a must for the markets to continue to have a more positive economic outlook.

It appears that we can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Anything to mention in regards to economic data releases?

On the economic data front, expect the markets to continue to brush aside March and April figures. Both months were an economic right-off, with extended lockdowns in place.

Prelim private sector PMI numbers from the Eurozone, the UK, and the U.S will draw plenty of attention later in the week, however.

The markets will get a sense of whether there has been any impact from the initial moves to ease lockdown measures.

We saw China’s private sector PMIs see a sharp rebound in response to the easing of measures.

For the U.S, service sector activity will need to see a marked improvement. For the EU, the markets will likely forgive another month of dire manufacturing PMIs. After all, the global supply chain remains broken.

Service sector PMIs will need to pick up from record lows, however, as non-essential businesses began to open earlier in the month of May…

For the UK, the numbers are likely to continue to remain particularly week as lockdown measures continue to weigh.

As we mention the UK, how are the negotiations continuing between the EU and the UK?

Till now, Brexit negotiations have made very little progress. The EU has even threatened to take the UK to court over a breach of freedom of movement rules.

In itself, the threat is a reflection of just how dire relations have become.

Boris Johnson continues to refuse to extend the transition period that leaves the chances of a hard Brexit in place.

We have seen the Pound bounce around as a result but could slide to sub-$1.20 levels by next month.

A blueprint needed to be in place by June for the UK government to continue talks.

Fisheries and trade remain 2 key areas and, for the Pound to find any support, progress is going to be needed…

Real Estate Showing Signs Of Collateral Damage- Part IV

This final part of our multi-part Real Estate article should help you understand what will likely transpire over the next 6+ months and how the unknown collateral damage may result in a “Double-Dip” price event taking place before August/September 2020.  In the first three parts of this article, we’ve attempted to highlight how the current COVID-19 virus event is different than any of the previous two crisis events.

We’ve also highlighted how consumer psychology will change over the next 12+ months as this event continues to unfold.  Most importantly, we attempted to highlight how the disruption in income, one of the biggest factors we should consider, for businesses, individuals, states, and governments will likely present a very real contraction event over the next 24+ months.

It is difficult to really explain how so many people fail to see what we are seeing in terms of our research.  Yes, the COVID-19 virus event will end at some point and the economy will begin to engage at growing rates.  Yet, the process of getting to that stage is likely to be full of unknown economic events over the next 24+ months.

We’ve published articles suggesting our Super-Cycles and generational cycle research suggests we have entered a 10 to 20 year period of “unraveling and crisis processes” before a rebuilding phase can begin to take place.  If our research is correct, this unraveling and crisis phase will end near 2025~26.  This suggests we have another 5+ years of unknown collateral damage and unknown economic events

On February 24, 2020, we published this article which is very important because it warned our followers to prepare for a crisis event and to protect your portfolios with what to expect in the yield curve.

Our suggestion is to plan to set up your portfolio so you have sufficient cash in reserve in the event of an unexpected market decline.  We also suggest proper protection/hedge investments, such as precious metals and metals miner ETFs.

The reality is that mortgage delinquencies have already begun to skyrocket higher.  It is obvious to anyone paying attention that the lack of real income opportunities for individuals and businesses will translate into major economic collateral damage processes (crisis events) playing out over the next 12+ months. Depending on how the COVID-19 virus lingers throughout the world and the extent of the global shutdowns, we could be on the cusp of experiencing one of the biggest “revaluation events” in history.

This Bloomberg article summarizes our research and thinking nicely. Despite government support, we believe a massive revaluation event related to Real Estate and other assets is just starting to unfold.  Skilled technical traders will stay keenly aware of this potential event and position their portfolios to protect assets in the event of a sudden change in trend.

Price trends have just started to move lower based on this data from Realtor.com up to March 2020.  We believe the April and May data will show a substantial collapse in pricing levels – particularly in areas that continue to experience high COVID-19 issues.  This suggests California, Washington, New York, New Jersey, Florida, and other areas could experience a sustained price decline lasting more than 12to 24 months.

Florida Real Estate Price Trends

Washington Real Estate Price Trends

Watch as more populated areas (cities and larger regional areas) see a shift in consumer sentiment related to Real Estate price levels over the next 6+ months.  Once the consumers start shifting away from seeing Real Estate as an opportunity at any price and begin to watch the price levels drop, their psychology changes in terms of “when will the bottom happen?”.  Once this happens, the markets change into a Bear market trend for real estate as at-risk homeowners are placed under severe pricing pressure and markets continue to implode.

What this means for skilled technical traders is that opportunities will be endless over the next 12+ months to target real gains through skilled technical trades.  As capital shifts from one sector to another – avoiding risk and attempting to capitalize on the opportunity, skilled technical traders will be able to ride these trends and waves to create substantial gains.

Protect your portfolios now.  Don’t fall for the overly optimistic “follow the NQ higher” trade as risks are still excessive.  Wait for the right setups and determine how much risk you can afford to take on each trade. This is not the time to bet the farm on one big trade – wait for the right setups and wait for the collateral damage to play out.

It doesn’t matter what type of trader or investor you are – the move in Gold and the major global markets over the next 12+ months is going to be incredible.  Gold rallying to $2100, $3000 or higher means the US and global markets will continue to stay under some degree of pricing pressure throughout the next 12 to 24 months.  This means there are inherent risks in the markets that many traders are simply ignoring.

I keep pounding my fists on the table hoping people can see what I am trying to warn them about, which is the next major market crash, much worse than what we saw in March. See this article and video for a super easy to understand the scenario that is playing out as we speak.

If you want to learn more about the Super-Cycles and Generational Cycles that are taking place in the markets right now, please take a minute to review our Change Your Thinking – Change Your Future book detailing our research into these super-cycles.  It is almost impossible to believe that our researchers called this move back in March 2019 in our book and reports.

If you have been following me for a while, then you know my analysis and trades are the real deal. You also would know that I made over $1.9 million from the financial markets during the 2008 crash and recover into 2010. I have been semi-retired since the age of 27.  I continue to follow, predict, and trade the markets because its the ultimate business and my passion.

A bear market and its recovery can make your rich in a very short period. I believe this is about to happen again, so why not follow my super simple SP500 ETF investing strategy?  Trade with your investment account and become a stock market success with me!

I’m offering my investing signals for the next few years to those who want to know their investment capital is in the asset. Let face it; there is a time to be 100% long stocks, to own an inverse fund, and when to sit in cash. Your financial advisor would NEVER recommend a cash position, why because he is not allowed, he and his firm will not make money. Instead, they will keep you long stocks, with some bonds, and you will have to ride out the bear market rollercoaster again.

During the March Market crash, the BEST position was cash for short term trades. EVERY asset fell in value (stocks, bonds, gold, commodities) two months ago. Only one asset rallied, guess what it was? The USD dollar (CASH), moving to USD cash, gained a whopping 11% while most indexes and sectors fell 35-80+%. all you had to do was close all positions in your portfolio, and you would have looked like a hero, and that’s what I did with my account and members of my swing trading newsletter.

Follow me to success. Trade my most simple single ETF investing strategy and know when to own stocks, when to own an inverse ETF, or be in cash. For only $149 you can have the keys to the kingdom during a time when we are going to experience more historical price swings. This is as good as it gets, in my opinion.

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As a technical analyst and trader since 1997, I have been through a few bull/bear market cycles in stocks and commodities. I believe I have a good pulse on the market and timing key turning points for investing and short-term swing traders. 2020 is going to be an incredible year for skilled traders.  Don’t miss all the incredible moves and trade setups.

Subscribers of my ETF trading newsletter had our trading accounts close at a new high watermark. We not only exited the equities market as it started to roll over in February, but we profited from the sell-off in a very controlled way with TLT bonds for a 20% gain. This week we closed out SPY ETF trade taking advantage of this bounce and entered a new trade with our account is at another all-time high value.

I hope you found this informative, and if you would like to get a pre-market video every day before the opening bell, along with my trade alerts. These simple to follow ETF swing trades have our trading accounts sitting at new high water marks yet again this week, not many traders can say that this year.

We all have trading accounts, and while our trading accounts are important, what is even more important are our long-term investment and retirement accounts. Why? Because they are, in most cases, our largest store of wealth other than our homes, and if they are not protected during a time like this, you could lose 25-50% or more of your entire net worth. The good news is we can preserve and even grow our long term capital when things get ugly like they are now and ill show you how and one of the best trades is one your financial advisor will never let you do because they do not make money from the trade/position.

If you have any type of retirement account and are looking for signals when to own equities, bonds, or cash, be sure to become a member of my Long-Term Investing Signals which we issued a new signal for subscribers.

Ride my coattails as I navigate these financial markets and build wealth while others lose nearly everything they own during the next financial crisis.

Chris Vermeulen
Chief Market Strategies
Founder of Technical Traders Ltd.

 

Reading the Tea Leaves of Gold’s Upcoming Move

To be bullish or not to be – that is the question. Or it might have been the question, if someone named Shakespeare wrote a piece titled Investhamlet.

The choice whether to be bullish or bearish or neutral on a given asset should be made each day, each time based on the information that is currently available. Let’s check the new signs that we saw yesterday.

First of all, we just saw a bearish sign from the general stocks market.

The Sign from Stocks

The huge price gap that we saw on Monday seems very encouraging, but please keep in mind that the S&P 500 once again failed to close the bearish price gap that it had opened in the first half of March. So, should one trust Monday’s bullish price gap? It seems too early in our view. The above-mentioned resistance is strengthened by the late-April high, and the S&P 500 futures moved lower yesterday.

And by “moved lower yesterday” we actually mean, they reversed in a way that’s quite profound in case of the S&P 500 futures.

The shooting star candlestick in the stock market futures points to a change in the trend, especially since stocks invalidated the tiny breakout above the late-April high and the 61.8% Fibonacci retracement level.

Also, please note the increase in volume on the previous chart – we saw the same thing at two April highs. Perhaps we’re seeing yet another high, instead of a beginning of a new upswing. We shall know soon enough – stocks are trading between the price gaps and they are likely to break out or break down sooner rather than later.

The implications for silver and mining stocks – which are more connected with the general stock market than gold is – are bearish.

While stocks reversed, the USD Index moved lower once again.

The USDX Bidding Its Time

The USDX moved below its 50-day moving average (marked with blue) and it closed there for the second day. That’s important, because that’s USD’s fourth attempt to break below this moving average and confirm the breakdown. The first two attempts took place in late March and in early April, and the breakdowns were invalidated on the next trading day in both cases. The third attempt took place about 3 weeks ago, and this time the breakdown was invalidated on the third day.

Will this time be different and the breakdown below the 50-day MA gets confirmed? We doubt it. The history repeats itself, after all, and a given pattern remains in place until it is clearly broken. This time, it seems that the USD Index will reverse once again, especially given its long-term breakout. The latter is likely to make the USD Index move much higher in the following months (possibly years), not only weeks. This doesn’t mean that we expect gold to decline in the long run, though. We think that a quicker 1-3-week-long decline is in the cards, but nothing more. It’s likely to be significant, though.

The implications of the most recent developments in the USD Index are bearish for the precious metals market.

As you can see in the lower part of the above chart, gold moved higher yesterday, but it moved up rather insignificantly. Gold futures were up by precisely $11.20, which means that they didn’t erase Monday’s decline.

Meanwhile in Precious Metals

Gold’s unwillingness to react to USD’s bullish lead can be viewed as bearish. The same goes for the sell signal from the Stochastic indicator. These signals that took place after Stochastic was close to the 80 level, were followed by quite visible declines in gold.

Consequently, the implications of yesterday’s session – and this week’s developments in gold – are bearish.

Then there’s silver that’s soaring like there’s no tomorrow and miners that just confirmed their breakout above the previous May highs.

Silver moved higher right after forming the daily reversal and it even moved above the intraday high earlier today. Silver is clearly outperforming gold. In case of the gold to silver ratio that’s based on futures, we saw a move slightly below 100, and in case of the ratio based on the spot prices, the ratio just touched the 100 level a few hours ago, and then it moved back up.

On one hand, the breakout above the 100 level in the gold to silver ratio seems to have been just verified, and it’s bullish.

On the other hand, silver reversed slightly above $18, which doesn’t correspond to a major resistance level. This means that the white metal could still move higher before topping. There are several resistance levels visible on the previous silver chart – between about $18,50 and about $20. Will silver really move as high shortly?

If the USD Index is bottoming and the general stock market is topping, then the above is very doubtful. In fact, silver’s relative strength on its own makes the short-term picture for the precious metals market rather bearish, because silver usually plays major catch-ups with gold in the final part of the rally. It definitely happened already and the extent to which silver outperformed gold, was clear and loud. Consequently, the top might already be in after all, as the 100 level in the gold to silver ratio is more important than any of the above-market individual silver resistance levels.

This leaves us with the bullish implications of yesterday’s move in the mining stocks.

There are two possibilities at this moment. Either the GDX ETF is breaking substantially higher here… Or it’s providing us with fake strength at the very end of the move.

Yes, the link between gold and gold miners is not as straightforward as it seems at first sight. On average, miners do tend to be weak sooner than gold during its rallies. However, there’s also this very final part of the upswing, in which miners fake their strength. Let’s take a closer look at this phenomenon. The chart below features gold and the HUI Index – proxy for gold stocks.

The above-mentioned link works both ways. That’s how the 2015/2016 decline ended. Miners underperformed in the first days of January and this was a fake move. That’s also how the February-March decline started – with gold miners’ outperformance. And that’s how many other moves in gold and gold miners have ended.

The black rectangles show periods when gold miners refused to fully follow gold’s lead, and the red rectangles show when gold miners temporarily multiplied gold’s signals.

So, is miners’ “strength” really “strength” to the full extent of this word’s definition? Given all the other points made today, this still seems doubtful.

Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. Please note that it’s just a small fraction of today’s full Gold & Silver Trading Alert. It also includes the fundamental analysis of the Great Lockdown with the emphasis on the dramatic changes on the US jobs market, as well as technical discussion of silver, mining stocks, USD Index, platinum, and palladium. They say that the partially informed investor is just as effective as partially trained surgeon… You might want to read the full version of our analysis before making any investment decisions.

If you’d like to read those premium details, we have good news. As soon as you sign up for our free gold newsletter, you’ll get 7 access of no-obligation trial of our premium Gold & Silver Trading Alerts. It’s really free – sign up today.

Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA

Editor-in-chief, Gold & Silver Fund Manager

Sunshine Profits: Analysis. Care. Profits.

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All essays, research and information found above represent analyses and opinions of Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and Sunshine Profits’ associates only. As such, it may prove wrong and be subject to change without notice. Opinions and analyses are based on data available to authors of respective essays at the time of writing. Although the information provided above is based on careful research and sources that are deemed to be accurate, Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA and his associates do not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the data or information reported. The opinions published above are neither an offer nor a recommendation to purchase or sell any securities. Mr. Radomski is not a Registered Securities Advisor. By reading Przemyslaw Radomski’s, CFA reports you fully agree that he will not be held responsible or liable for any decisions you make regarding any information provided in these reports. Investing, trading and speculation in any financial markets may involve high risk of loss. Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA, Sunshine Profits’ employees and affiliates as well as members of their families may have a short or long position in any securities, including those mentioned in any of the reports or essays, and may make additional purchases and/or sales of those securities without notice.